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A day with dog and gun, rod or rifle

Notes from the North Woods

This nice bull moose was recently discovered feeding along the banks of the Ausable River, in the late afternoon. Moose are currently paired as they approach the peak of their annual breeding. Both moose and moose calls have become a rather common occurrence across the Adirondacks in recent years.

This nice bull moose was recently discovered feeding along the banks of the Ausable River, in the late afternoon. Moose are currently paired as they approach the peak of their annual breeding. Both moose and moose calls have become a rather common occurrence across the Adirondacks in recent years. Photo by Bill Moore

“The hills have also lost, to some extent, the health-giving qualities of the soft woods, with their fragrant germ-destroying odors, the efficacy of which in curing disease is universally admitted.

The air of this region is pure, clear, humid and at all times invigorating, forming one of the attractions and sources of pleasure to the tourist just from the heated, noisome atmosphere of an overcrowded city.

As soon as the sun lowers in the west the temperature drops, and be the day ever so hot, the evening is cool, and the atmosphere tonic. People from inland places who are suffering from insomnia, generally experience little or no trouble in obtaining refreshing sleep with its resultant health and strength.

The pursuit which takes us afield and gives us rest and exercise combined, and increases our resources by broadening our interest in nature, is not merely a pastime, but a recreation benefiting both mind and body, and better preparing us for our duties as citizens of the State.

No one would think of asserting that the value of

New York's game animals was to be reckoned in the terms of the bill-of-fare. A few thousand dollars would express their wealth to the butcher or restaurateur, but to the true sportsman they are an exhaustless mine of wealth.

A day with dog and gun, rod or rifle may bring small return from a pecuniary point of view, but who

can calculate the amount of physical good and pure enjoyment it has afforded?

Game bag and creel may, indeed, be empty, while our mind is full of stimulating experiences, all increasing our eagerness to take to the field again.

So the hunter of birds with opera glass and camera finds an even deeper pleasure in his excursions into their haunts and study of their ways; a pleasure for which no accounting of the value of birds to the State can ignore.”

Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net.

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