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A day with dog and gun, rod or rifle

Notes from the North Woods

This nice bull moose was recently discovered feeding along the banks of the Ausable River, in the late afternoon. Moose are currently paired as they approach the peak of their annual breeding. Both moose and moose calls have become a rather common occurrence across the Adirondacks in recent years.

This nice bull moose was recently discovered feeding along the banks of the Ausable River, in the late afternoon. Moose are currently paired as they approach the peak of their annual breeding. Both moose and moose calls have become a rather common occurrence across the Adirondacks in recent years. Photo by Bill Moore

Rifles and packbaskets that have been handed down from father to son to grandson will be slung upon a new set of shoulders. These tools of the trade will travel along the well worn trails, and through the same swamps over which they have passed for generations.

Undeniably, the sporting life is the common glue that continues to bind the far netherlands of the park together. It is an undeniable heritage that links all of the user groups together in a shared passion for outdoor adventure.

Despite the park’s widely diverse interest groups, it is a common love of the land that continues to link all woodland wanderers with an historic lineage of hunters and gatherers.

We must learn to accept the fact that we share a common, predatory heredity, and despite our various woodland pursuits; we are all linked by a shared passion for the outdoor life, and the pleasures we enjoy while traveling to and through such wild lands.

It is a passion that remains at the very depths of our existence. We all carry this same genetic stew in our packs, and whether we decide to satisfy our innate craving for the hunt with a camera, a paddle or a .30-.30, Winchester, the fact remains, we remain indelibly linked by our shared love of the land.

It is interesting to note, that a common love of nature and our desire to recreate on wild lands is not just a fleeting preoccupation. Quite obviously, it has been around for over a century as is evident in the following passage taken from the Seventh Report of the Forest, Fish and Game Commission, New York, in 1902.

One hundred and ten years have passed since these words were first penned, but they ring as true today, as there were when first put to paper.

Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net.

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