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‘Battle on Snowshoes’ program to be presented

Schroon Lake event Sept. 30

A local historian will offer a trek back in time to the French and Indian War when the Schroon Lake-North Hudson Historical Society hosts a program on the famed “Battle on Snowshoes.” Bob Bearor and his wife, Holly, will present “Stepping Back in Time” Sunday, Sept. 30, at 3 p.m. at the Strand Theatre in Schroon Lake. Admission is $5 for adult and $3 for children.

A local historian will offer a trek back in time to the French and Indian War when the Schroon Lake-North Hudson Historical Society hosts a program on the famed “Battle on Snowshoes.” Bob Bearor and his wife, Holly, will present “Stepping Back in Time” Sunday, Sept. 30, at 3 p.m. at the Strand Theatre in Schroon Lake. Admission is $5 for adult and $3 for children.

— A local historian will offer a trek back in time to the French and Indian War when the Schroon Lake-North Hudson Historical Society hosts a program on the famed “Battle on Snowshoes.”

Bob Bearor and his wife, Holly, will present “Stepping Back in Time” Sunday, Sept. 30, at 3 p.m. at the Strand Theatre in Schroon Lake. Admission is $5 for adult and $3 for children.

Bearor is a noted authority on the battle, which was fought in Ticonderoga in 1758. He wrote the book “Battle on Snowshoes,” which was made into a film by producers Colin and Dave Bannon. Adirondack folksinger Chris Shaw did the music, which is available on cassette and CD.

In 2008 the Bearors marked the 250th anniversary of the battle by presenting programs across the state and raising money for charities. They have brought their historical programs to schools and community groups for many years.

Bearor was a co-founder and member of the New York State 250th French and Indian War Commeration Commission.

For information on the Schroon Lake event, call Loris Clark at 532-0533.

The “Battle on Snowshoes” took place March 13, 1758. It was fought by members of British Ranger companies led by Robert Rogers against French troops and Indians allied to France. The battle was given its name because the British combatants were wearing snowshoes.

Rogers led a band of about 180 rangers and regulars out to scout French positions. The French commander at Fort Carillon (called Ticonderoga by the British) had been alerted to their movement and sent a force consisting mostly of Indians to meet them. In fierce fighting, the British troops were decimated, with more than 120 casualties.

The battle gave rise to the tale that Rogers escaped capture by sliding 400 feet down a rockface to the frozen surface of Lake George. That rock is now known as Rogers Rock or Rogers Slide.

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