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Car show planned in Port Henry

‘Flying Farmer’ to be featured Oct. 6

Norm Monette will have his “Flying Farmer” at the second annual Moriah Classic Car and Truck Show on Saturday, Oct. 6, at the Port Henry Knights of Columbus. The car show will be held 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. There is free admission for spectators and a $10 registration fee for cars wishing to compete for prizes. People can enter by calling Monette at 546-7852.

Norm Monette will have his “Flying Farmer” at the second annual Moriah Classic Car and Truck Show on Saturday, Oct. 6, at the Port Henry Knights of Columbus. The car show will be held 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. There is free admission for spectators and a $10 registration fee for cars wishing to compete for prizes. People can enter by calling Monette at 546-7852.

— Norm Monette used to take pride in having the fastest car in the Northeast. Now, he’s happy to have the best looking vehicle.

Monette will have his “Flying Farmer” at the second annual Moriah Classic Car and Truck Show on Saturday, Oct. 6, at the Port Henry Knights of Columbus.

The car show will be held 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. There is free admission for spectators and a $10 registration fee for cars wishing to compete for prizes. People can enter by calling Monette at 546-7852. Trophies will be awarded at 2 p.m.

The Port Henry Knights of Columbus will have a chicken barbecue starting at 11:30 a.m. that day. Tickets are $9 each. There will also be a bake sale.

The “Flying Framer” is a 1957 Chevrolet that Monette, a Moriah resident, used to race at tracks around the Northeast in the 1960s. He’s owned the car for 52 years. Monette retired from racing when his children were born, but kept the car.

A farmer by trade, hence the name “Flying Farmer,” Monette bought the 1957 Chevy Bel Air four-door hardtop for $1,100 in 1960. It contained a 283-cubic inch engine backed by an automatic transmission and was finished in Sierra Gold. It’s size and weight made for an unlikely race car, but Monette had success throughout his decade of competition.

Monette’s racing career was highlighted in the August issue of “Hemmings Muscle Machines” magazine.

“When we had our family Norm decided to stop racing,” explained his wife, Shirley Monette. “But he kept the car. He could never bring himself to sell the car.”

The car sat idle for years. Then, seven years ago, the Monettes’ daughter developed breast cancer. The couple decided they would do whatever they could to raise money and awareness to fight the disease.

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