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It is the age of discontent

From the Editor's Desk

As a journalist, something I’ve noticed increasingly over the past few years is the growing discontent of people, largely since The Great Recession.

The blame for the mess differs, as does proclaimed solutions, but there seems to be an overwhelming sense of loss of control, of helplessness against forces one disagrees with or feels oppressed by.

Personally, it seems to me this has been a long time coming and that, upon close examination, we all really want the same thing, on a very simple level, but the specifics we each turn to consistently divide us.

But even if we all suddenly found ourselves on the same page, it seems that apathy runs as rampant as dissatisfaction and frustration.

Life is busy, we are being pulled in a multitude of directions and stretch ourselves thin, leaving little time to organize our thoughts and ourselves, despite the fact doing so just might be among the top two or three things we should be doing with ourselves.

Plus, many feel helpless and that it is hopeless.

I recently read a book and then watched the movie, Cloud Atlas, and it contained much of this struggle, a compelling reflection of the times.

At one point, David Mitchell, the author, has a character try to strong arm another against getting involved in a fight he believes in by pointing out that he is “No more than one drop in a limitless ocean,” to which the other character responds, “Yet what is any ocean but a multitude of drops.”

One might think romantic notions are merely for the movies, but this world could use an infusion of passion and belief.

I consistently try to reinforce in my daughter that even the smallest act, even a sole person, makes a difference with his or her actions or through the behavior that is modeled, sometimes immediately, other times over a great span, possibly by impacting one person, who impacts two, who impacts three, etc.

Stephen Bartlett may be reached at stephen@denpubs.com

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