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United Way reaches out to Ticonderoga area

Human services agency would like greater role

Maria Burke, left, director of Literacy Volunteers, and Barb Brassard, director of the Retired Senior Volunteer Program, review United Way information following a meeting in Ticonderoga.

Maria Burke, left, director of Literacy Volunteers, and Barb Brassard, director of the Retired Senior Volunteer Program, review United Way information following a meeting in Ticonderoga.

— The United Way of the Adirondack Region would like to increase its presence in southern Essex County.

Officials of the agency, which serves Essex, Clinton and Franklin counties, visited Ticonderoga recently to explain their program and ask for input from local leaders.

“The Ticonderoga area has the potential to increase our capacity to help our partner agencies bring services to this area,” said Gayle Alexander, chairwoman of the 2013 United Way campaign. “We’d like to be move involved in Ticonderoga.”

Alexander was part of a United Way contingent that met with area government, civic and business people at Inter-Lakes Health Oct. 26.

The United Way of the Adirondack Region includes 41 partner agencies that provide human services to the North Country. In 2012 United Way assisted more than 80,000 people in Essex, Clinton and Franklin counties.

John Bernardi, executive director of the United Way of the Adirondack Region, said the Ticonderoga meeting was to help the group determine the needs and priorities of the Ticonderoga area and to find ways United Way can assist.

The United Way of the Adirondack Region is already present in the area. Several local United Way agencies — the Substance Abuse Prevention Team of Essex County, Literacy Volunteers, Retired Senior Volunteer Program, Mountain Lake Services and the Essex County Mental Health Association — had representatives at the gathering.

Bernardi acknowledged United Way would like to increase monetary contributions from the Ti area, but said that was only part of the reason for the visit to Ticonderoga.

“Fund raising is an important part of what we do, but it’s only part,” he said. “Most important is how we use those funds with our partner agencies to support programs that help people.”

Kathy Snow, United Way director of development, explained the 211 telephone program that allows people to get health and human services information by calling 211. Help with child care, children’s activities, counseling and support groups, food, clothing, shelter, aging services, transportation, substance abuse, domestic violence, veterans affairs and more is available by calling 211 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily. The information is also available online at www.hudson211.org

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