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Ticonderoga nature trail re-dedicated

Science teacher leads project

The Ticonderoga Schools Nature Trail was re-dedicated Oct. 22. Taking part were, from left, Janet Mallon, Ti Middle School science teacher; Mike Mound, regional director of northeast operations for SCA Tissue; Sheldon Burleigh, president of PRIDE; Nancy Connery, whose family supported the project; and Walt Lender, executive director of the Lake George Association.

The Ticonderoga Schools Nature Trail was re-dedicated Oct. 22. Taking part were, from left, Janet Mallon, Ti Middle School science teacher; Mike Mound, regional director of northeast operations for SCA Tissue; Sheldon Burleigh, president of PRIDE; Nancy Connery, whose family supported the project; and Walt Lender, executive director of the Lake George Association. Photo by Nancy Frasier.

— Naturalists and recreationalists can again enjoy the Ticonderoga school nature trail.

The trail, located behind the Ticonderoga Middle School, has been reconstructed. The four-year project officially came to an end with a re-dedication ceremony Oct. 22.

“We had this beautiful nature trail, but it had become over-grown,” said teacher Janet Mallon, who led the project. “It was a long process to reconstruct it, but it’s done and is a tremendous resource.”

The trail, about a half mile long, was cleared, widen and stablized. Seven interpretive signs were placed along the path to education people about their surroundings.

The project was completed without taxpayer money. Support came from the Connery family, the Lake George Association, SCA Tissue of Glens Falls, International Paper Co., PRIDE of Ticonderoga, Ticonderoga Girl Scouts, John Reale and Chris Mallon.

Janet Mallon’s science students and teacher Jim Marshall’s technology students assisted with the project.

Emily DeBolt, LGA educator, was also praised by Mallon for her work in creating the signage. The signs allow for a self-guided tour of the trail.

Mackenzie Strum, Emily Powers and Susan Ward of Girl Scout Troop #3068, who were students in Mallon’s living environment biology class last academic year, created the sign at the trail’s entrance as a community service project.

“Lots of people were involved,” Mallon said. “That’s the way it should be; it was a true community project.”

The trail is open to the public and will also be used by students, particularly Mallon’s science classes.

“The trail has everything a teacher is looking for,” Mallon said. “The theme is succession — how things change over time. You can see those changes all along the trail.”

The trail was originally built by science teacher Keith Dolbeck and students in 1986. Those students, nearly three decades ago, also made a booklet detailing the trail and what was along it. Mallon showed that booklet during the re-dedication ceremony.

The natural trail is officially linked to the town’s LaChute Trail system. Mallon hopes signs will soon be erected along the LaChute Trail directing people to the nature trail.

John McDonald, Ti school superintendent, said the trail is a welcome addition to the community.

“It wouldn’t have happened without Janet (Mallon),” McDonald said. “She knew what needed to be done and what people to bring together. She took the idea, with the help of the Connery family and others, and made it reality.”

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