Quantcast

‘Lightning luck’ strikes twice for elated lad in 'Great Duck Race'

Isabella Lewis, 8  (left) and Kasey Baker, 5 — both of Brant Lake — paint pumpkins at a craft activity held Saturday in conjunction with the Great Brant Lake Duck Race — a beloved local community tradition. Craft session supervisor Maureen Robinson said the community was indebted to Chuck and Cindy Hilton and Danny Wolke  for their donations of six dozen pumpkins  for area children to paint and take home. Wolke also donated a massive 250-pound pumpkin that was to serve as a decoration at the event, but was left near the town ballfield because it was too heavy to move.
“The turnout here was wonderful,” Robinson said.. “And the kids had such a good time..”

Isabella Lewis, 8 (left) and Kasey Baker, 5 — both of Brant Lake — paint pumpkins at a craft activity held Saturday in conjunction with the Great Brant Lake Duck Race — a beloved local community tradition. Craft session supervisor Maureen Robinson said the community was indebted to Chuck and Cindy Hilton and Danny Wolke for their donations of six dozen pumpkins for area children to paint and take home. Wolke also donated a massive 250-pound pumpkin that was to serve as a decoration at the event, but was left near the town ballfield because it was too heavy to move. “The turnout here was wonderful,” Robinson said.. “And the kids had such a good time..” Photo by Thom Randall.

— With a captain’s hat perched on his head, Eric Isachsen stood in the rain Saturday shortly before noon, gazing at the mill pond where the Great Brant Lake Duck Race would be held in a few minutes.

His duties as race “Quackmaster” would normally require him to guide the many hundreds of plastic ducks through a wooden channel towards a finish line, he said.

In the last several years, the weather has posed challenges, he added. Several years ago, the wind blew the ducks out of the channel, and the firefighters raced all over the pond in a boat attempting to round up the little plastic quackers. This year, the rain prompted the race officials to forgo dumping the plastic ducks off the mill pond’s upper-dam bridge, and the winners would instead be selected randomly out of a heap of ducks in the Horicon Fire Co. firehall, he continued.

Holding a minnow net, Adam Schultz, 10, stood nearby in the drizzle outside the firehouse, and talked about his hopes for winning a prize in the annual race. This year, few people showed up due to the rain, and his chances of winning, however slim, were boosted with the low turnout, he said.

Several years ago, his mother had made a deal with his babysitter that if she went to the firehouse and bought several entries for him, she could have half the proceeds if they won, the boy added.

“My mom thought the prize that year would be $10 or so,” Adam said with a grin. “But we won and we had to split $180 with our babysitter.”

As the boy was recalling the incident, several hundred more people showed up in the minutes before the annual duck race.

The morning’s rain subsided, and this last-minute crowd boosted the turnout beyond last year, race organizers said.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment