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Turning Back the Pages

The former Bonnie Brae Villa, once a palatial summer home built in 1865 at the base of Dackinsack Mountain near Raymond Lane, Warrensburgh, was later renamed The Manor restaurant. This photograph was taken by Jean Hadden on Feb. 17, 1980, a mere 24 days later, the house was totally destroyed by arson fire.

The former Bonnie Brae Villa, once a palatial summer home built in 1865 at the base of Dackinsack Mountain near Raymond Lane, Warrensburgh, was later renamed The Manor restaurant. This photograph was taken by Jean Hadden on Feb. 17, 1980, a mere 24 days later, the house was totally destroyed by arson fire. Photo by Jean Hadden.

His rescue was due to Halsey Fuller of Luzerne who had a camp near by and had been a guide in the Stony Creek area for many years. Fuller heard feeble cries, sobs and groans and found Murray who had fallen to the ground and was unable to rise. His clothing was torn to shreds and he was weak and exhausted from his long fast and was in a highly nervous state from being lost. He was carried on a stretcher to Fuller’s camp and it was two hours before the young man was revived but he was still unable to walk.

Murray was taken to Creek Centre (Stony Creek) and left for his home on the afternoon train, still in a state of agitation. Dr. W.W. Aldrich says he will never fully recover from the effects of his dreadful experience.

Noble lady dies in Hawaii

Cordelia Church Bishop, daughter of Nelson R. and Harriet Osborne Bishop, born in Warrensburgh in 1835, died on Wednesday, Sept. 23, 1912 in Honolulu, Hawaii. The deceased was the widow of Col. William F. Allen, late of Honolulu, who held a position under the government as collector of customs.

Mrs. Allen was a descendant of two of Warrensburgh’s oldest families, the Bishops and the Osbornes. She was distinguished for her many lovable traits of character and graces of mind and body. Her cousin, Charles Reed Bishop, also a native of Warrensburgh, left this place in 1841 to seek his fortune and after many adventures landed in the Hawaiian Islands where he married Princess Bernice Pauahi Paki, daughter of King Kamehameba the fourth and he became the ruler’s confidential advisor, acquiring great influence and wealth.

After considerable correspondence with her cousin, Miss Bishop was induced to make the long voyage alone to the islands which became known as the Paradise of the Pacific. Soon after her arrival she formed the acquaintance of Colonel Allen and they were married. Col. William F. Allen Sr., her father-in-law, was dean of the diplomatic corps. He died in the White House in Washington, D.C. when he was visiting there and suffered a heart attack.

Readers are welcome to contact Adirondack Journal correspondent Jean Hadden at jhadden1@nycap.rr.com or 623-2210.

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