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Turning Back the Pages

The former Bonnie Brae Villa, once a palatial summer home built in 1865 at the base of Dackinsack Mountain near Raymond Lane, Warrensburgh, was later renamed The Manor restaurant. This photograph was taken by Jean Hadden on Feb. 17, 1980, a mere 24 days later, the house was totally destroyed by arson fire.

The former Bonnie Brae Villa, once a palatial summer home built in 1865 at the base of Dackinsack Mountain near Raymond Lane, Warrensburgh, was later renamed The Manor restaurant. This photograph was taken by Jean Hadden on Feb. 17, 1980, a mere 24 days later, the house was totally destroyed by arson fire. Photo by Jean Hadden.

Right hand shot off

While hunting squirrels in the woods north of Warrensburgh on Thursday afternoon, Oct. 3, 1912, Herbert C. Smith, Town Clerk of Warrensburgh, was severely wounded in both hands by the accidental discharge of his weapon, a double-barrel breech loading shot gun. A weak wrist caused him to drop the gun which struck a stump and went off as he grasped the barrel to save it from striking the ground. His right hand was literally shot to pieces and was amputated at the wrist by Dr. Thomas Cunningham at the Glens Falls Hospital about four hours after the accident occurred. The left hand was also badly mangled and torn by the charge of bird shot but no bones were broken and it can possibly be saved.

Mr. Smith was hunting in the company with E.C. Austin, salesman for the Warrensburgh Woolen Company and Ernest C. “Kid” Manzer, Warrensburgh barber. Mr. Smith is about 40 years old and has a large family. He is a brother of Deputy Sheriff Truman H. Smith of Thurman. He moved here from the north several years ago where he was an Adirondack guide. His warm friends sympathize with him deeply in his great misfortune.

Hunter’s nervous breakdown

Charles Murray of New York, while hunting with a party in West Stony Creek, was lost in the woods for two nights and a day and when found, he had given up all hope of rescue and resigned himself to death. His condition was pitiable and he probably will never recover from the effects of his terrible experiences.

The party Mr. Murray was with was made up mostly of Stony Creek men. They went into the woods on Monday morning intending to stay for two weeks. While in the woods alone, Murray, instead of taking a proper turn as he had been carefully instructed to do, kept walking straight and in an hour he became hopelessly lost in the forest. He frantically fired his gun and shouted, but to no avail.

Readers are welcome to contact Adirondack Journal correspondent Jean Hadden at jhadden1@nycap.rr.com or 623-2210.

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