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Small group protests moose killing in Wilmington

This nice bull moose was recently discovered feeding along the banks of the Ausable River, in the late afternoon. Moose are currently paired as they approach the peak of their annual breeding. Both moose and moose calls have become a rather common occurrence across the Adirondacks in recent years.

This nice bull moose was recently discovered feeding along the banks of the Ausable River, in the late afternoon. Moose are currently paired as they approach the peak of their annual breeding. Both moose and moose calls have become a rather common occurrence across the Adirondacks in recent years. Photo by Bill Moore

— “Just felt really strongly that the moose shouldn’t have been killed,” McCaffrey said.

McCaffrey said the DEC should have allowed nature to take its course without human intervention.

Jason Oconnell, of Brushton, said the DEC shouldn’t have shot the moose who was inside the wildlife preserve and not hurting anyone.

“We’re in the Adirondack Park. It’s the biggest park in the country, and that’s what it’s for,” Oconnell said. “It’s for the animals in the woods not rich people from downstate on vacation.”

The protest was organized by Brenda Rose Dadds-Woodward, a wildlife photographer from Dannemora.

Dadds-Woodward came to see the moose every day while it stood in the river. On Sept. 25, she cancelled her plans when she heard the news the moose had been killed.

“I actually just started crying at the computer. I was going to bring my son to see the moose that day, too,” Dadds-Woodward said. “My son said, ‘Those are mean people. They could have saved him.’”

She started organizing the protest right away. Of the almost 80 people who agreed to attend via the event’s Facebook page, nine attended.

Dadds-Woodward said she was disappointed with the small turnout of protestors but she plans to do more.

“I want a change in the DEC,” Dadds-Woodward said. “They need to get more educated on how to help (the animals) not just kill them.”

Dadds-Woodward said she wants to get in touch with people in the DEC and try to understand why the moose was killed and see what can be done to stop the killing of more wildlife like the one she called Bruce.

“If they are going to fight us, we are going to just keep protesting until those changes are made,” Dadds-Woodward said.

DEC DEFENDS SHOOTING

Winchell and Durfey said they understand people are upset about the killing of the moose but the actions taken by the DEC were following protocol outlined in the New York State Moose Response Manual. Dated April 1, 2011.

The protocol lays out how to deal with moose near busy roadways and sick and injured moose.

For more information about the moose manual, go to the DEC website and follow the link: www.dec.ny.gov/animals/74663.html to read the entire protocol.

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