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Ecumenical service to kick off Memorial Day observance

Crown Point events may 27 and 28

Crown Point's 144th annual Memorial Day observance will begin with an ecumenical church service. The service will be held at 11 a.m. Sunday, May 27, in Veterans Park.

Crown Point's 144th annual Memorial Day observance will begin with an ecumenical church service. The service will be held at 11 a.m. Sunday, May 27, in Veterans Park.

— Crown Point's 144th annual Memorial Day observance will begin with an ecumenical church service.

The service will be held at 11 a.m. Sunday, May 27, in Veterans Park.

“The community of Crown Point will gather at the gazebo located in the park once owned by the Hammond family and next to the town’s memorial for its war dead,” said the Rev. David Hirtle of the First Congregational Church of Crown Point. “The same Hammond family that sacrificed and lead our nation through many conflicts. The ecumenical service shared by the churches of Crown Point will focus the community’s attention to the sacrifice, the commitment and the legacy of the men and women of this beautiful community.”

The service will include music by Jackie Popp, Jeris French and Kathy Hyatt.

Readings will be shared by that will mark the observation as well as a message by the Rev. Gregg Trask.

“Prayers and scripture to be shared will console the loss and ask God’s blessings on the country that our war dead gave their lives for,” Hirtle said. “Crown Point’s historic and long standing observation will begin by a gathering of community and a focus on the true reason for this American day of memorial.”

The pastor noted Memorial Day traces its roots to the Civil War.

“Historically, it is believed that Memorial Day was officially proclaimed on May 5, 1868, by Gen. John Logan, national commander of the Grand Army of the Republic, in his General Order No. 11., and was first observed on May 30, 1868, when flowers were placed on the graves of Union and Confederate soldiers at Arlington National Cemetery,” Hirtle said. “There is also evidence that organized women’s groups in the South were decorating graves before the end of the Civil War. Whatever the exact date, the origins of the day include the decoration and the practice of calling to memory those who fought and died for our country.

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