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Vermont band brings joy to Ticonderoga

Vermont Joy Band preps for tour with Ti visit

The Vermont Joy Band spent a week in Ticonderoga preparing for his next tour. The band includes Anna Pardenik on guitar, Dan Fancher on percussion, Taylor Smith on bass, Ben Aleshire  on cornet and sousaphone,  Galen Peria on accordion and piano, Devin Robinson on double bass and Benjamin Strosberg on banjo and washboard. Peria, a Ti native, is kneeling at the right.

The Vermont Joy Band spent a week in Ticonderoga preparing for his next tour. The band includes Anna Pardenik on guitar, Dan Fancher on percussion, Taylor Smith on bass, Ben Aleshire on cornet and sousaphone, Galen Peria on accordion and piano, Devin Robinson on double bass and Benjamin Strosberg on banjo and washboard. Peria, a Ti native, is kneeling at the right.

Vermont Joy Parade, a Burlington-based band, has a simple goal.

“World domination,” Ben Aleshire exclaimed. “We want the entire world listening to our music.”

The band spent a week in Ticonderoga recently preparing for two-month spring tour that will take it from New England to the South to the Midwest and Canada. It’s the band’s sixth U.S. tour. It has twice toured Europe. The group stayed with the family of band member Galen Peria.

“Being able to spend time together rehearsing in this atmosphere is like being with family,” Devin Robinson said. “The Perias are wonderful. They’re our biggest fans.”

The tour follows the March 31 release of Vermont Joy Parade’s second CD, “New Anthem.”

The group, which formed in 2008, has an irreverent streak and tours in a used-vegetable-oil-powered, red-painted school bus — making it reminiscent of the Merry Pranksters of the 1960s. In 1964 Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters traveled across the United States in a psychedelic-painted school bus. Their escapades were chronicled by Tom Wolfe in “The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test.” Among the Merry Pranksters were the Grateful Dead, Wavy Gravy and Neal Cassady.

Peria, son of Barbara and Brad Peria, doesn’t discount the comparison.

“There are comparisons to the Grateful Dead, but we’re not that easy to figure out,” said Peria, a 1999 Ticonderoga High School graduate.

Vermont Joy Parade has been described as a “circus.” Along with its music, the band provides audiences with a series of theatrical and comical treats. There’s juggling, unicycles, extending fists and more.

“We start every show by coming out of a piano — like people getting out a clown car,” Peria said. “There’s a lot of confetti, jokes — you never know. It’s audience beware.”

The group’s name tells it all, according to Benjamin Strosberg.

“We’re from Vermont,” he said. “We really do have fun and want to spread that joy — and every performance is like a parade.”

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