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Students restoring vehicle for sheriff’s department

CVES class doing the work

The automotive tech class at Champlain Valley Education Services in Mineville is restoring a humvee for the Essex County Sheriff’s Department. Taking part in the project are instructor Art Miclette and students Cole Brooks, Doug Marshall and Michael Ennenga of Crown Point, Troy Morin and Ryan Smits of Moriah, Austin Martin of Westport and Atom Farrell of Keene. Assisting the class are Marc Austin and Gene Staubitz, former Mineville auto tech students, who are now employees of Village Auto in Crown Point. Helping when the humvee arrived were Anthony Childs, Jordan Greenough and Brandon Chappell, Moriah students who were “shadowing” the auto tech program for the day.

The automotive tech class at Champlain Valley Education Services in Mineville is restoring a humvee for the Essex County Sheriff’s Department. Taking part in the project are instructor Art Miclette and students Cole Brooks, Doug Marshall and Michael Ennenga of Crown Point, Troy Morin and Ryan Smits of Moriah, Austin Martin of Westport and Atom Farrell of Keene. Assisting the class are Marc Austin and Gene Staubitz, former Mineville auto tech students, who are now employees of Village Auto in Crown Point. Helping when the humvee arrived were Anthony Childs, Jordan Greenough and Brandon Chappell, Moriah students who were “shadowing” the auto tech program for the day.

— The Essex County Sheriff’s Department is getting some help from local students.

The automotive tech class at Champlain Valley Education Services in Mineville is restoring a humvee for the police agency.

“It’ll be a neat project,” said Art Miclette, auto tech instructor. “We do body work, small engine repair, we do a little bit of everything here so this will be a good experience.

“It’s more heavy-duty than the boys are used to,” he said of humvee, “but they seem excited. I think the biggest attraction is being able to test drive it when we’re done.”

A humvee is a High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle. It’s a four-wheel drive vehicle primarily used by the United States Armed Forces.

The 1987 humvee is available to the Essex County Sheriff’s Department through an Army surplus program. The humvee came from Fort Drum and can be used by the sheriff’s office as long as it’s needed, explained Maj. David Reynolds of the sheriff’s department, at no cost.

Why a humvee?

“The idea arose last year during Hurricane Irene,” Reynolds said. “This will give us the ability to reach people isolated by floods and get to areas that require four-wheel drive. It’s a heavy-duty machine.”

The humvee is in good shape, but needs some work, Reynolds said.

“We’ll restore it and make it road worthy,” Miclette said of the humvee. “We know there are some brake issues and it needs a lot of body work. It hasn’t had service (maintenance) in years.”

Miclette plans to have the vehicle ready by the end of the school year.

“That gives us 12 weeks,” the teacher said. “That should be plenty of time to get it back on the road.”

The sheriff’s department will pay for all the materials associated with the project. The students will provide free labor.

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