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Second grade class goes ‘prehistoric’

Students present books they created about dinosaurs in class

Second-grade students at Westport Central School became the teachers as they presented their findings on dinosaurs to parents and teachers.

Second-grade students at Westport Central School became the teachers as they presented their findings on dinosaurs to parents and teachers. Photo by Katherine Clark.

— Second-grade students were the teachers for faculty, parents and classmates, bringing everyone back to prehistoric jurassic time with books they created about dinosaurs.

Students from Lynne Bubbins’ second grade class created books about particular dinosaurs and described to the audience what the dinosaurs looked like, ate, and what could be told about dinosaurs from their fossils.

“The kids did research from the computer labs, books in the library and books that I have in the classroom. They’ve worked really hard and they did a great job,” Bobbins said.

Students began this project in early January, researching their dinosaurs and writing the books and drawing the illustrations.

Student Auden Clifford wrote his book about the pachycephalosaurus dinosaur. In his book, he told the class about his dinosaur, nicknamed by scientists as “a thick headed reptile” for his crash helmet like skull. Clifford said his dinosaur’s fossil had been located in Washington State.

In their books, some students wrote they would be excited to see dinosaurs alive today but were glad they weren’t around.

“I’m glad dinosaurs aren’t here because carnivores would eat people, herbivores would stomp people and the egg eaters would steal all the eggs,” Wren VanDeusen read from her book on Deinonychus antirrhopus.

The students also wrote what they speculated were the reason the dinosaurs became extinct.

“Most of us think it was volcanic eruptions that killed the dinosaurs but some think it was a meteor crashing to the earth,” Bubbins said.

Bubbins said she has been doing this project with her second-grade students every year to make the study of dinosaurs more interactive for the students. By making the books, Bubbins said the students were able to incorporate many areas of learning.

“They were able to learn about science, math, reading, and history through this project,” Bubbins said. “They’ve worked extremely hard and learned a lot.”

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