Quantcast

Glaude farm cleanup still under way in Ellenburg

Dave Malark and Steve Chilton load metal from the Glaude barn that burned down March 5. Chilton brought his tractor to help with the cleanup, and said the community comes together in times of crisis.

Dave Malark and Steve Chilton load metal from the Glaude barn that burned down March 5. Chilton brought his tractor to help with the cleanup, and said the community comes together in times of crisis. Photo by John Grybos.

— Adding to the grief of losing the barn and silo Derrick took over from his father and the death of his cows is hate mail the family’s received since the fire at their barn was covered by media outlets.

A detail in news stories notes that lowing of the cows alerted the family to the fire. That’s led to hate mail blaming the Glaudes for the cows’ deaths.

It didn’t happen that way, said Kaufman. Rose and Derrick declined to go on the record with the North Countryman because of the angry messages they got following the news stories. According to Kaufman, a passer-by saw flames in the barn about 6:30 p.m., then ran to the farmhouse and banged on the doors and windows. Rose was home and saw that Derrick’s truck was gone. She figured he was safe at the milking barn, but the old barn at the homestead went up in 20 or 25 minutes. She never heard the cows, and the flames spread too fast for a rescue.

The cows there were young cows being raised to produce milk,and older cows that had dried up and would be bred. They’re cycled to the milking barn once they freshen, and taken back to the home farm when they’ve made their last milk.

Hay for the animals and extra hay for the milking barn were kept there, and Kaufman said the family’s had many offers from other farmers to drop off hay if needed.

A large tractor and smaller Ford tractor were destroyed inthe blaze along with many smaller tools. As Chilton was sifting through the hay, he found a blackened set of bolt cutters that seemed to still work.

There were so many small tools in the barn, “We won’t know what’s gone until we go to get them,” said Kaufman.

Though their home is within yards of where the barn stood, there was no heat or smoke damage. Their attached garage was fine, too.

The farm was taken over in 1956 by Derrick’s father, and along with the death of his animals, that history has made for significant emotional fallout.

“This was definitely a family legacy, and it's hitting him pretty hard,” said Kaufman.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment