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Glaude farm cleanup still under way in Ellenburg

Dave Malark and Steve Chilton load metal from the Glaude barn that burned down March 5. Chilton brought his tractor to help with the cleanup, and said the community comes together in times of crisis.

Dave Malark and Steve Chilton load metal from the Glaude barn that burned down March 5. Chilton brought his tractor to help with the cleanup, and said the community comes together in times of crisis. Photo by John Grybos.

— After flare-ups finished claiming some remaining barn structure, and smoldering supports led to the oldest silo on the property being torn down, clean-up at the Glaude farm is a long a careful process.

On top of the list of priorities was burying the around 100 cows that died in fast-burning barn fire March 5. Aided by a pair of neighbor-lent tractors, family and friends picked through the still-burning hay just a few dozen yards from the farmhouse to pull out the blackened metal.

To take care of that top priority, they had to pull all that debris from the fallen barn to make room for an excavator brought over by fireman Robbie Hogan. They tugged and dragged the metal with a tractor borrowed from Stacy “Boots” Manor, a corrections officer at Dannemora and a localfarmer.

From just down the road, Steve Chilton, retired from Northern Adirondack Central, had Dave Malark drive his tractor while he loaded it up.

“The community has been so wonderful,” said Kim Kaufman, step-daughter of Derrick Glaude, farm owner. “It’s a great community to be in. It really shows what the North Country can do.”

Chilton said that’s just how things are in Ellenburg.

“If we have a flood in town or anything, we live in such a rural area we’ve got to take care of ourselves. We’re a long way from big cities,” said Chilton.

Support wasn’t only coming from other local farmers. Rose and Derrick both drive bus for NAC, and Rose’s kids on bus 74 gave them handmade cards, many drawn in crayon, to cheer up the farm owners. One girl baked a loaf of banana bread.

“I know that when we had our farm, we loved our cows like they were family,” wrote bus rider Ashton Wright.

That’s just why burying the cows was so important to Derrick, said Kaufman. They weren’t simply the farm’s livelihood, but an important part of his life.

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