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Codes concerns dominate Ticonderoga meeting

Trustees debate problems in codes enforcement

Faced with resident complaints, the Ticonderoga town board is wondering what to do with its code enforcement office. People are concerned the codes office isn’t open to deal with residents, that inspections aren’t being completed in a timely fashion and that permits and other paperwork aren’t being processed.

Faced with resident complaints, the Ticonderoga town board is wondering what to do with its code enforcement office. People are concerned the codes office isn’t open to deal with residents, that inspections aren’t being completed in a timely fashion and that permits and other paperwork aren’t being processed.

— Faced with resident complaints, the Ticonderoga town board is wondering what to do with its code enforcement office.

People are concerned the codes office isn’t open to deal with residents, that inspections aren’t being completed in a timely fashion and that permits and other paperwork aren’t being processed.

There was a long discussion about the codes enforcement office during a special town board meeting in February. Ti’s codes office is staffed by Wayne Wagner, a full-time employee, and Bill Ball, a 35-hour a week employee. Neither Wagner or Ball attended the meeting.

“There have been complaints that the code enforcement officers are falling behind with inspections, permits and paperwork,” Ti Supervisor Deb Malaney said after the meeting. “The codes officers feel they need more help.”

Ticonderoga had a clerk that was shared by the codes office, the town assessor and the planning board. When that position became vacant, the town board decided not to fill it as a cost-saving measure.

“We have to work to become more efficient,” Malaney said. “Not having a clerk is an additional burden on those three departments, but we must save money any place we can.”

Not hiring a clerk saves Ticonderoga taxpayers $35,000 a year.

“The codes officers feel they need a clerk,” Malaney said. “We’re looking for solutions without hiring somebody, if possible. We can’t let inspections and permits lag. The bottom line is that everyone, the codes office included, has to modify the way they do business.”

During the special meeting, trustee Jeff Cook said the codes enforcement office needs better management, not additional help.

Councilman Steve Whitford disagreed. Whitford believes the codes office needs the clerk’s position to be filled.

Wayne Taylor, a board member, suggested the codes officers be required to submit regular paperwork so the board can see what is being done and when. That way, he pointed out, an accurate picture of the codes office can be framed. Then the town board can decided whether a clerk is actually needed.

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