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Turning Back the Pages

Baby boy Allison Mark Langworthy, born   Jan. 24, 2012, survived that year’s cold winter in a cozy box in the family’s kitchen stove at their home on River St. in Warrensburgh. He’s the grandfather of Allison Apple, who still lives in town on Hudson St. with her husband Thomas and several of their children.

Baby boy Allison Mark Langworthy, born Jan. 24, 2012, survived that year’s cold winter in a cozy box in the family’s kitchen stove at their home on River St. in Warrensburgh. He’s the grandfather of Allison Apple, who still lives in town on Hudson St. with her husband Thomas and several of their children.

Plank road sold to Warren County

On March 6, 1912, the Warren County Board of Supervisors in session at Lake George, adopted a resolution introduced by Supervisor E.J. Worden of Caldwell, appropriating $6,000 for the purchase of the Lake George-Warrensburgh Plank Road Co. and all rights and titles and other claims to the road of that entity. In consideration of the payment of $6,000 by the county treasurer, John Bazinet, the county acquires all rights, privileges and titles in the road and is relieved of all claims against the Plank Road Company. Supervisor Patterson of Glens Falls cast the only opposing vote.

(Note…The plank road consisted of heavy boards laid crossways on timbers over a graded surface. A plank road was originally laid from Glens Falls to Lake George in 1848 by a stock company and the section from Lake George to Warrensburgh was laid in 1849 and later on in 1850 the road was extended “through the wilderness” from Warrensburgh to Chestertown. Weather raised havoc on those early roads. It was a rough but essential way to travel in the Adirondack’s frontier days. At the turn of the century with the advent of automobiles, better roads became a necessity and Warrensburgh’s Senator James Emerson used his power to advance them.)

Supervisor controversy ended

The town board of Hague, as was anticipated, has appointed Richard J. Bolton supervisor, thus ending a heated controversy brewing since the election last fall. Mr. Bolton, a Republican, who had held the office two terms, was a candidate for re-election last September against Bernard A. Clifton, a Democrat. Clifton was elected by four votes but was forced to be disqualified from holding the office because of the fact that he was a school trustee at the time he was elected supervisor.

A lengthy dispute between the politicians of the town than ensued and the town board refused to make an appointment for some time as the members were divided between Clifton and Bolton. The matter finally came to a vote on March 16, 1912 when Bolton was finally re-appointed as supervisor by a vote of three to two votes by the town board.

Readers are welcome to contact Adirondack Journal correspondent Jean Hadden at jhadden1@nycap.rr.com or 623-2210.

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