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Turning Back the Pages

Baby boy Allison Mark Langworthy, born   Jan. 24, 2012, survived that year’s cold winter in a cozy box in the family’s kitchen stove at their home on River St. in Warrensburgh. He’s the grandfather of Allison Apple, who still lives in town on Hudson St. with her husband Thomas and several of their children.

Baby boy Allison Mark Langworthy, born Jan. 24, 2012, survived that year’s cold winter in a cozy box in the family’s kitchen stove at their home on River St. in Warrensburgh. He’s the grandfather of Allison Apple, who still lives in town on Hudson St. with her husband Thomas and several of their children.

Despondent woman takes her life

The people of Bolton Landing were greatly shocked on the morning of March 6, 1912 to learn of the tragic death of Mrs. William Cole, who during the night had ended her life by opening an artery in her left arm with a razor and allowing herself to slowly bleed to death. Life was extinct when she was found at eight o’clock in the morning by her father, Asa Granger, with whom she had made her home. Coroner Rogers ruled that the death was clearly a case of premeditated suicide.

Mrs. Cole was about 50 years of age and during the past 17 years, some people said she had suffered spells of temporary insanity. Owing to domestic troubles, her husband left her about nine years ago and since that time she had grieved constantly which greatly aggravated her mental condition. She had many good qualities which won her a large circle of friends who deeply regret the sad ending of her life. Besides her father, she is survived by a daughter, Gladys Cole. Her husband’s whereabouts are unknown. She was buried in the Huddle Cemetery.

Local explorer believed safe

A press dispatch from New York, dated March 8, 1912, states that Harry V. Radford, the arctic explorer and fellow of the American Geographical Society, who at one time was a resident of North Creek and left there in 1909 for four years exploration of Northern Canada, is reported forsaken by his guides in the barren lands of the northern end of Hudson Bay, 500 miles inland and it was believed that he was left without provisions. However, a late dispatch from Ottawa, Canada states it is believed there that the report is incorrect. A letter from T.G. Street, Radford’s companion, recently stated that it had been arranged for guides to turn back after the first stage of the northern journey and it is thought that the Indians leaving the men was only part of the pre-arranged plan.

Readers are welcome to contact Adirondack Journal correspondent Jean Hadden at jhadden1@nycap.rr.com or 623-2210.

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