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Learn history of country doctors at Owens House

Sharalee Falzerano, left, gives a tour of “The Country Doctor” exhibit at the Owens House in North Creek. News Enterprise Reporter McKenna Kelly, right, listens to stories about the various physician instruments on display.

Sharalee Falzerano, left, gives a tour of “The Country Doctor” exhibit at the Owens House in North Creek. News Enterprise Reporter McKenna Kelly, right, listens to stories about the various physician instruments on display. Photo by Andy Flynn.

— At the Owens House, there’s a Life magazine article from Sept. 20, 1948 titled, “Country Doctor.”

The photo shows Dr. Ernest Ceriani walking through the weeds in Kremmling, Colo., carrying his doctor’s bag on his way to a house call.

“Dr. Ceriani begins to work soon after 8 o’clock and often continues far into the night,” the article reads. “He serves as physician, surgeon, obstetrician, pediatrician, psychiatrist, dentists, oculist, and laboratory technician. Like most rural g.p.s he has no vacations an few days off, although unlike them he has a small hospital in which to work.”

Such is the life of a country doctor, whether in Colorado or the Adirondack Mountains.

The 2012 Owens House exhibit — “The Country Doctor” — examines the history of doctors in the town of Johnsburg from the early 1800s to the present.

Sharalee Falzerano, a volunteer from the Johnsburg Historical Society and curator of “The Country Doctor” exhibit, explained that all the medical instruments and furniture were originally donated mainly by Hilda Grunblatt, the wife of Dr. Jacques Grunblatt, who was the physician in North Creek from 1949 to 1975.

“Everything you see is from the historical society with the exception of some of the posters,” Falzerano said. “I added those in for a little color.”

The medicine bottles are from different doctors, including Dr. O’Keefe. The portable X-ray machine — the Coolidge X-Ray Outfit — was owned by Dr. Stevens.

“If you look at the instruments, you’ll see some scary-looking ones,” Falzerano said. “Of course I put the gruesome ones in the front and put them on little easels to make one wonder. Those saws are amputee saws, even though some doctors may have used them to cut off casts.”

There’s a children’s activity of seek-and-find, where kids look for certain doctor items in the room.

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