Quantcast

CVES forced to cut more positions

Champlain Valley Tech building trades instructor Kevin Shaw, left, shakes hands with students at the June dedication of the renovated Moriah court house. Classes from Yandon Dillon Educational Center in Mineville built the addition to the court house for the town.

Champlain Valley Tech building trades instructor Kevin Shaw, left, shakes hands with students at the June dedication of the renovated Moriah court house. Classes from Yandon Dillon Educational Center in Mineville built the addition to the court house for the town.

— However, rising costs and inadequate aid over the past few years have caused school officials to return special education students from CVES to the districts in an attempt to provide them with services at a lower cost.

Parents and concerned educators have said some districts do this well, while others are not providing special education students with adequate services now. Parents wonder how a district that previously said it did not have the resources to educate their children will be able to do so now with less money.

The most recent reductions at CVES, which are a direct result of these pull-backs, will impact administrators, faculty, teaching assistants, clerical and support staff.

“In the fall, we will have fewer numbers in the programs we offer,” said Roxanne Pombrio, CVES director of special education. “For example, we now have four 6-1-1 classrooms, and in the fall we will have two. The class will run just as it does currently. If a student needs an aid, that student will have an aid.

“The students we have remaining will still get the same level of service.”

This year, the special-education department provided services to 209 students, and this fall that number will drop to around 130.

Despite the cuts, CVES is planning to offer two new programs in response to needs expressed by area special education directors.

The first is a Day Treatment Program, which would serve students with severe mental-health disabilities. This program could prevent them from being shipped out of the area and away from their families, and should be in place halfway through the 2012-13 school year.

The second is a Job Target Program, which would provide special-education students with training in fields such as food-service, hospitality and manufacturing. The hands-on program could be in place by the 2013-14 school year.

“There are a number of hotels and factories in the area,” Pombrio said. “Once they leave this program, hopefully they will have employment opportunities.”

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment