Quantcast

Students showcase science research

Bolton High School Junior Valerie Jensen (left) presents her research findings on climate changes in the ecosystem at the school’s First Annual Science Research Symposium held recently.

Bolton High School Junior Valerie Jensen (left) presents her research findings on climate changes in the ecosystem at the school’s First Annual Science Research Symposium held recently. Photo provided

— Six students enrolled in Bolton High School’s advanced science research course presented their findings recently on a variety of topics at the school’s Science Research Symposium.

The students gave presentations May 31 to an audience of 40 people — and discussed their findings while manning displays depicting their research.

The following BCS sophomores and juniors presented research findings on the respective topics:

• Madlyn Wilson reported on her research on mirror self-recognition by Bottlenose Dolphins.

• Ceshele Powell talked of her research on the prevalence of obesity among children in six Chicago communities based on findings from a health survey;

• Liam McGurl spoke on the effects of calorie restriction on behavioral patterns and moods in mice;

• Valerie Jensen, presented a summary of her discoveries relating to climate change in the ecosystem;

• Carl Ciccarelli presented his findings on the difference in the velocity of a baseball hit by a wooden bat versus a metal one and the associated risk of injuries to players; and

• Samantha Boyle reported on her research on the relationship between sleep disorders and nightmares.

Taught by BCS secondary science teacher Nicole Williams, the research course is offered to students in grades 10 through 12. Students choose a topic and carry out an original research project.

Williams explained that students in the course are mentored to employ professional research techniques.

The advanced science students are also expected to present their work in symposia and competitions. During the students’ Junior and Senior years, they may be eligible for up to 12 college credits, Williams said.

“I am very proud of the students for all of their hard work,” Williams said, “and I’m excited to see the results of their research as they continue next year.”

She added that all students, regardless of academic record, can apply to take this course. She said the only prerequisites are that candidates are diligent and self-motivated.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment