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Bateaux to pass through Ticonderoga

Trek to begin in Crown Point

“The Big Row — Exploring the 18th Century via Mohawk River bateaux” will travel from Crown Point through Ticonderoga to Bolton June 11-15 using a bateaux — a flat-bottom cargo boat.

“The Big Row — Exploring the 18th Century via Mohawk River bateaux” will travel from Crown Point through Ticonderoga to Bolton June 11-15 using a bateaux — a flat-bottom cargo boat.

— The trip will begin at the Crown Point state campground Monday, June 11, with a day of preparation. Plans are to launch the bateaux Tuesday and row to Ticonderoga, traveling up the LaChute River to Bicentennial Park. There the crew will camp overnight near the boat launch.

Manthey said the distance from Crown Point to Bicentennial Park, via water, is about 17 miles. He expects his crew of seven to cover about 2 miles an hour.

On Wednesday the bateaux will portage to Lake George, being pulled uphill over The Portage to the Mossy Point boat launch.

“This is the portage day,” Manthey said. “We will try to start the portage by 10 a.m. We will use the bateaux wagon to take the boat out of La Chute on the old boat ramp in the park. We will cross above the last falls on the highway bridge. After crossing La Chute, we will ascend on The Portage 2.5 miles to Lake George to the public boat launch.”

Once they reach Lake George, the crew will row to the Rogers Rock Campsite and camp overnight.

Thursday the crew plans to trek from Rogers Rock to Huletts Landing, where they will camp. The trip will conclude Friday with a 9.5-mile row to the Bolton town park.

In Bolton the vessel and crew will take part in the “Crossroads of the French & Indian War” re-enactment June 16 and 17.

Manthey hopes people will see the group and approach.

“We welcome people stopping us and asking us questions,” he said. “We’re happy to talk to everyone. We want to share our experiences.”

The bateaux is a flat-bottomed vessel, allowing it to have a very shallow draft. With a full crew, it only draws five or six inches of water. The principal power is oars. It is generally crewed by a steersman and from two to four rowers. When there is a following or side wind, the bateaux can be sailed.

This will not be the first visit to Ticonderoga by the bateaux. It was in the community in 2008 as part of that year’s “Big Row.”

Other “Big Rows” have included trips to Rogers Island, Livingston, Vergennes, Vt., Oswego, Plattsburgh, Ogdensburg and the Mabee Farm in Rotterdam Junction.

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