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Village and town will partner on solar plan

Following a rare joint intermunicipal meeting held Tuesday Jan. 24, Lake George Village Superintendent of Public Works Dave Harrington (center) talks to Lake George Town Supervisor Dennis Dickinson (right) and town board member Dan Hurley (left) about the prospects of converting the two government facilities to solar power.

Following a rare joint intermunicipal meeting held Tuesday Jan. 24, Lake George Village Superintendent of Public Works Dave Harrington (center) talks to Lake George Town Supervisor Dennis Dickinson (right) and town board member Dan Hurley (left) about the prospects of converting the two government facilities to solar power. Photo by Thom Randall.

— Amid unprecedented expressions of municipal cooperation, the leaders of Lake George’s two local governments decided Tuesday, Jan. 24 to work together on exploring conversion to solar energy and pursuing consolidation of functions and resources.

The actions were taken at a rare joint meeting between the Lake George Village trustees and the Lake George town board.

Town board member Marisa Muratori and village Public Works Superintendent Dave Harrington revealed they have been taking action exploring the concept of installing solar panels to energize various municipal facilities, both to save money and to shrink the governments’ carbon footprint.

As of Tuesday, Harrington had given two solar engineering firms preliminary tours of the Lake George town and village facilities, and several more similar surveys and interviews are scheduled for the near future.

Based on the success that the Town of Chester has experienced already in their solar panel installations, Muratori said she had high hopes for the solar energy initiative.

“This is one of the things we can do to boost our sustainability locally, as we increase our efforts to rely on our community resources,” she said.

The two boards resolved to move forward on the project, as consultants have warned that federal incentives for solar conversion are expiring soon.

Harrington said there’s plenty of room at the northwest edge of the parking lot at the village-town hall complex for a lineup of solar panels, which are 16 feet deep. He also said there was plenty of space at the village landfill.

The solar conversion project in Chester is virtually complete, with solar panels installed at the town landfill and garage, and yet to be completed at the town ski area, health center and Municipal Center.

When completed in several months, the project is expected to save 10 percent to 25 percent on electric bills, while producing no carbon dioxide pollution.

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