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Schroon artists included in exhibition

Anne Gregson’s work on display

Schroon lake artist/printmaker Anne Gregson poses with one of her Solarplate works, ‘Too Much Carnivale. ‘Three of her prints are featured in the ‘Winter Magic’ exhibit that opens this weekend in the Art in Chester Gallery.

Schroon lake artist/printmaker Anne Gregson poses with one of her Solarplate works, ‘Too Much Carnivale. ‘Three of her prints are featured in the ‘Winter Magic’ exhibit that opens this weekend in the Art in Chester Gallery.

— A Schroon Lake artist is exhibiting her work nearby.

Anne Gregson’s work is part of “Winter Magic,” which is on display at the North Country Arts Center in Chestertown.

Located on Main Street, the gallery will be will open weekends through March 3. The exhibit features three works by Gregson and works by 45 other Warren and Washington county artists.

Gregson, who works from her Schroon Lake home, was born in New Jersey but has lived in several states. In 1981, she came to the Adirondacks, where she settled in Schroon Lake. She is a retired art teacher at Schroon Lake Central School.

The Schroon artist has worked in many mediums, but has concentrated on Solarplate printmaking recently. The artform makes use of light-sensitive metal plates to create an image that looks like an etching.

To make a Solarplate print, Gregson explained, the artist makes a drawing on a transparent or translucent film. Gregson often uses a film of ground glass. The metal plate is coated with a light-sensitive material, the film placed on top of the plate, and then the ultraviolet light from a sunlamp helps impress the image on to the plate. Gregson then processes the plate further with water to create the image she wants.

Sometimes she uses watercolors to make the print more vibrant; often she uses sepia tones to capture an older, antique look. The solarplating process can make a print look like either an intaglio print or one done in relief; it can also make the print look like an etching, a lithograph, a screenprint, a linocut, and even a photograph.

Gregson said her art focuses on fun.

“Keep it fun,” she said, “and flexible. Begin with a vision of what you want, and then let the materials talk to you as you create.”

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