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Adult day care offers much to elderly

The Adult Day Care program at the Adirondack Tri-County facility could use a few more participants. The program’s covered by Medicaid, said Sue Stoddard (top left) who heads the program. Maria Radyn (bottom left) and Beatrice Van Guilder (bottom right) are program participants. Dorothy Baker (top right) works with Stoddard.

The Adult Day Care program at the Adirondack Tri-County facility could use a few more participants. The program’s covered by Medicaid, said Sue Stoddard (top left) who heads the program. Maria Radyn (bottom left) and Beatrice Van Guilder (bottom right) are program participants. Dorothy Baker (top right) works with Stoddard. Photo by John Grybos.

— While a karaoke couple sang old tunes in the activity room, the elderly Maria Radyn busily colored a cartoon image of Cookie Monster.

Radyn beamed while she praised the Adult Day Care program at the Adirondack Tri-County Nursing Home and Rehabilitation Center.

“When I don't come, like on Saturday and Sunday, I very much miss this place,” said Radyn, who speaks with a noticeable accent.

She was married in Poland, and moved to the U.S. at 24. She now lives with her son in Warrensburg. Before that, she spent 40 years in Philadelphia working in real estate.

“I was rich one time,” she said.

Radyn attends the day care every day, and has been a regular for about a year. Participants can come as few as one or as many as five days throughout the week, and the program isn't at full capacity. The day of the visit with Radyn, only one other day care visitor was there, and the program could use a few more attendees.

“I hate to see it not full,” said Program Director Sue Stoddard, a registered nurse with 40 years of experience. She's been with the day care program for five years.

The program isn't just a way to keep older citizens busy, said Stoddard. Their participants have minor health issues that need looking after, and the staff is happy to accommodate nearly any demands on their expertise.

“There's not too much I can't do,” said Stoddard. “If I can't do it, I learn to do it.”

Common problems are diabetes and obesity, just as in the population at large, said Stoddard. Less common are Alzheimer's and dementia patients, though the program will accept non-combative patients with those issues. The can perform oxygen therapy and respiratory treatments, too.

Because of the facilities available, lab work can be done while patients are visiting day care. Physical therapy is available, and when the patient is through, they can return to day care. If the participants need care that isn't offered on-site, the staff can drive them as far as Warrensburg. They'll also pick up and drop off people with the facility's bus, equipped with a wheelchair lift. It's especially useful for the elderly who live alone, or with an employed relative.

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