Quantcast

Ticonderoga receives artwork

Painting donated to community

“War Party from Ticonderoga,” a painting by Robert Griffing, has been donated to the town and now hangs in the Community Building lobby. The donation was arranged by historians Keith Dolbeck, right, and Dan Blanchette of Ticonderoga.

“War Party from Ticonderoga,” a painting by Robert Griffing, has been donated to the town and now hangs in the Community Building lobby. The donation was arranged by historians Keith Dolbeck, right, and Dan Blanchette of Ticonderoga.

— A new piece of art graces the halls of Ticonderoga’s Community Building.

“War Party from Ticonderoga,” a painting by Robert Griffing, has been donated to the town and now hangs in the town hall’s lobby.

The donation was arranged by historians Keith Dolbeck and Dan Blanchette of Ticonderoga. Dolbeck and Blanchette are field test representatives for Whites Electronics, using Whites equipment as they search for historical artifacts in the area. The men asked White to make the donation to the town.

“I think that it is appropriate that a town like ours, named after a Native American terminology showcases a portrayal of Native American artwork,” Dolbeck said.

The name Ticonderoga is Native American, meaning land between two waters.

Dolbeck noted that Griffing was inspired to paint “War Party from Ticonderoga” after a visit to the area. Beneath the painting is a “special inscription” to the people of Ticonderoga from Griffing.

Griffing grew up in Linesville, Pa., collecting stone artifacts, the key factor for his love of history and native cultures. After graduating form the Art Institute of Pittsburgh and a 30-year advertising career, he returned to the subject of his early fascination, the Eastern Woodland Indian of the 18th century. Griffing decided to devote his time and energy to his passion after receiving an enthusiastic response to his early paintings and prints.

He describes himself as a painter of 18th century scenes that involve or feature the Eastern Woodland Indian. His paintings focus on a time that marked the beginning years of chaos and uncertainty for the Woodland tribes as they struggled to survive the encroachment of Europeans.

In addition to his extensive library of books, historical papers and journals, he relies on historian and re-enactor friends who provide information and act as models for some of the characters in the paintings.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment