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Historic Trades program comes to Fort Ticonderoga

Workshops, demonstrations planned

Fort Ticonderoga has already hosted four workshops as part of its Historic Trades program — one on coat making, two on making leather breeches and another on making napsacks.

Fort Ticonderoga has already hosted four workshops as part of its Historic Trades program — one on coat making, two on making leather breeches and another on making napsacks.

— Besides the workshops, there will be daily demonstrations of the Historic Trades program during the fort’s 2012 season.

“Every soldier — French, English and American — needed clothes and shoes,” Lilie said. “Most of those items were made right here at Fort Ticonderoga. This is an exciting addition to the Fort Ticonderoga experience.”

Anderson comes to Fort Ticonderoga with 12 years living history experience, both as a re-enactor and museum profession. He has previously worked for Middleton Place, a National Historic Landmark located in Charleston, S.C., specializing in livestock, carriages and military programming. In his own business, Anderson Tailoring, he hand-stitched, custom-fit Revolutionary War uniforms and civilian clothing.

Anderson studied at East Tennessee State University, pursuing his musical skills. An avid equestrian, researcher, and 18th century mechanic, he has already contributed to Fort Ticonderoga’s living history programs in 2011.

Lilie, who has worked at Colonial Williamsburg, is responsible for the development and implementation of Fort Ticonderoga’s interpretive department.

Lilie is a graduate of The College of William & Mary. He has worked in several interpretive and trades positions at Colonial Williamsburg and served as an apprentice archaeologist with the Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities at Jamestown. He has consulted on historical equestrian matters for films at Mount Vernon, 96 Battlefield, Moore’s Creek, Vicksburg and Cowpens National Park.

An avid Revolutionary War and Seven Years war re-enactor, Lilie has taken his belief in high standards of authenticity to work on the development of educational programming for many national sites including Colonial Williamsburg, Putnam Memorial State Park, Fort Dobbs State Historic Site, Minute Man National Park, Endview Plantation, Virginia War Museum and Middleton Place.

Hill noted community revitalization discussions have included talks about attracting artists to Ticonderoga. She believes the fort’s Historic Trades program can help.

“We’ve talked about developing Ticonderoga as a destination for artisans,” Hill said. “I believe this can help with that effort. I believe the fort and Ti can both be vibrant experiences.”

Fort Ticonderoga has been open to the public more than 100 years.

Built in 1755 by the French, the fort was captured by the British and Provincial forces in 1759 during the French & Indian War.

It was here in 1775 that Ethan Allen captured it from the British; the first victory of the American Revolution. It was cannon from Fort Ticonderoga that Colonel Knox hauled to Boston for George Washington’s Army. The British evacuated Boston as a result.

For information call 585-2821.

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