Quantcast

Trial program mulled for Lake George boat disinfection concept

In 2010, volunteers place mats designed to curb the spread of Asian Clams in Lake George. Environmentalists have noted that it is 50 to 100 times cheaper to prevent invasives from taking hold in a lake versus trying to combat their propagation once they’ve become established. The Lake George Park Commission is considering a law requiring inspection of all boats, before they are launched in the lake,  for the presence of invasive species and mandating remedial disinfection, if needed.

In 2010, volunteers place mats designed to curb the spread of Asian Clams in Lake George. Environmentalists have noted that it is 50 to 100 times cheaper to prevent invasives from taking hold in a lake versus trying to combat their propagation once they’ve become established. The Lake George Park Commission is considering a law requiring inspection of all boats, before they are launched in the lake, for the presence of invasive species and mandating remedial disinfection, if needed.

— Prompted by lobbying from environmentalists and resolutions enacted by local municipalities, members of the Lake George Park Commission are now taking steps toward making their proposed boat inspection and decontamination law a reality.

Feb. 3, the Commission’s Invasives Species Spread Prevention Committee discussed establishing a trial boat inspection and vessel disinfection program within several months at Norowal Marina.

While the trial program features voluntary compliance, the proposed law would require all boats, before they are launched on Lake George, to be thoroughly inspected — and if deemed necessary — sent to a vessel-washing station to be decontaminated.

Already, the Park Commission has a law in place that prohibits placing a boat in Lake George that bears any invasive species — but since the law doesn’t require every boat to be inspected, it doesn’t necessarily have any impact on protecting the lake, environmentalists have argued. Also, because it includes no comprehensive inspection program nor remedial requirements, the law has little practical effect.

Environmental experts have noted that to protect Lake George from widespread infestation and degradation, action is needed.

The fast spread of invasive plants and mussels in Lake Tahoe and Lake Mead have shown that it is far easier and 50 to 100 times cheaper to prevent invasives from taking hold in a lake versus trying to combat their propagation once they’ve become established.

The Lake George Association has been conducting a voluntary boat inspection program for two years.

During summer 2011, the LGA’s “Lake Stewards” at six boat launches inspected 8,584 boats for invasive species, removed suspicious specimens from 52 boats prior to launch, and educated over 19,000 people about the threats of invasive species.

Both the Lake George Village Board and the Lake George Town Board have passed resolutions in support of a law requiring inspections of all boats placed in Lake George for the presence of invasive species, and mandatory decontamination by washing, if necessary.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment