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Ticonderoga Emergency Squad moves into new home

State-of-the-art building open

Rick Morse, left, president of the Ticonderoga Emergency Squad, and Mark Barber, captain, stand outside the unit’s new building at 118 Champlain Avenue.

Rick Morse, left, president of the Ticonderoga Emergency Squad, and Mark Barber, captain, stand outside the unit’s new building at 118 Champlain Avenue.

— The Ticonderoga Emergency Squad is settling into its new home.

The ambulance service has moved into its new building at 118 Champlain Avenue, located between Champlain Avenue and The Portage.

“It’s a great building and has already been a big help to us,” said Rick Morse, squad president. “Morale has really picked up. Everybody feels good and is more involved.”

The Ticonderoga Emergency Squad had been located in a small garage behind the Community Building since 1963. That building long-ago became too small for a modern ambulance corps. The location also caused concerns about emergency vehicles pulling into traffic.

The new building is 4,100 square feet with access from Champlain Avenue and The Portage.

“We think we have a great location here,” Morse said. “We’re very pleased with the way things have turned out.”

The new building is on the site of the old Ticonderoga Civic Center and was sold to the ambulance squad in 2009 by the town of Ticonderoga.

The building includes two drive through bays, a meeting room, offices, kitchen, lounge and storage areas, Morse said. It also has a state-of-the-art propane heating system that automatically adjusts to weather conditions. It also has a generator so it can remain operational during power outages. The architect was Steve Jung of Schroon Lake.

The building project had a budget of $860,000 — $280,000 raised by the squad and a $600,000 loan. Work was just recently completed and there are still some outstanding bills, but Morse said the project will be under budget.

Still, there is a 30-year mortgage. The Ticonderoga Emergency Squad receives no taxpayer funding from Ticonderoga and operates strictly on donations, insurance billing and donations.

“We’ll always be fund raising,” Morse said. “That’s how we survive. WE have to pay the mortgage on the building, maintain our equipment, meet our financial obligations.”

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