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Dissolution committee holds first meeting

Public meeting set for Feb. 22 at 6 p.m.

Members of the Village of Keeseville dissolution committee met Jan. 31 with developers, a member of the Department of State and local town supervisors.

Members of the Village of Keeseville dissolution committee met Jan. 31 with developers, a member of the Department of State and local town supervisors. Photo by Keith Lobdell.

— The stone is now rolling on the potential dissolution of the Village of Keeseville.

Members of a committee assigned to look into dissolving the village met with representatives from Fairweather and Rondout Consulting firms at the kick-off meeting for the process Jan. 31 in the Keeseville Village offices.

Along with introducing the process to the committee, the group set up a public kick-off meeting for Wednesday, Feb. 22 at 6 p.m. at the same location.

“This will be a chance for people to understand where we are going and where they can get more information on the process,” Tim Weidmann of Rondout Consulting said.

The meeting was the first step in looking at possibly eliminating the village government, but Peter Fairweather of Fairweather consulting said that they would be weighing all options.

“This is an informal discussion on why we are here and what people may want out of this process,” Fairweather said. “We have been through these studies in a number of towns, and we find that this process goes best when we keep the lines of communication open and work to come up with something that is good for everyone in the community.”

Wiedmann said that they have been involved in a number of studies looking at the topic of dissolution along with consolidating services and other options.

“We can talk about all of the alternatives and how they fit here,” Weidmann said. “This is a conversation that is happening in villages all throughout the state, and each one may have a different answer. What was good in Schuylerville may not be good here.”

Fairweather said that the firms want to make sure that they stick to a nine-month plan in order to work through the studies and planning involved in dissolution cases.

“We want to move through this as expeditiously as possible,” Fairweather said. “It will take a while to go through and understand what each of the services are and how they fit into the study. What this process makes you do is go through and look at the budget for each municipality differently. It’s the first time that you can go through and see the total cost of each of the services.”

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