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Turning Back the Pages

For 21 years around the turn of the 20th century, this building was the headquarters of the Glens Falls Insurance Co.  on the east side of Glen St. north of Bay St. The photograph shows it raised from its foundation in 1912, ready to be moved across Glen St. to become a Masonic temple. In subsequent years, it was incorporated into the Episcopal Church campus. The ‘new’ insurance building built on the east side of the road was demolished in the 1970, replaced by Glens Falls’ sole ‘skyscraper.’

For 21 years around the turn of the 20th century, this building was the headquarters of the Glens Falls Insurance Co. on the east side of Glen St. north of Bay St. The photograph shows it raised from its foundation in 1912, ready to be moved across Glen St. to become a Masonic temple. In subsequent years, it was incorporated into the Episcopal Church campus. The ‘new’ insurance building built on the east side of the road was demolished in the 1970, replaced by Glens Falls’ sole ‘skyscraper.’

Fish hatchery to be built here

The bill introduced by Senator James A. Emerson on Jan. 24, 1912, in the upper house of the state legislature, providing for the establishment of a state fish hatchery in Warrensburgh was read twice and ordered printed after which it will be committed to the committee on finance. The sum of $20,000 or whatever amount needed is to be put aside for this purpose. This has been a pet project of Senator Emerson for quite some time.

Sudden death for young man

Fred Johnson, 25, a former resident of North Creek, died suddenly of heart disease the night of Jan. 29, 1912 at his home in Albany. He was the son of Thomas S. Johnson and was born and raised in North Creek.

He had carried a scuttle of coal from the cellar and reached the top of the stairs when he fell to the floor and expired.

Mr. Johnson was a man of much promise. He was a graduate of the Albany College of Pharmacy and manager of a large drug store in the capital city. He leaves a widow and two children.

Mystery disease strikes horses

From some sections of the state come reports that an unknown disease is causing the death of many horses, mostly those fed straw. The animals die within three or four days after being stricken and veterinaries are unable to find a cure. (Note: It’s an odd coincidence that today, 100 years later, another mystery disease, Pasteurella, an unusual bacterial illness, has been advancing into the Adirondack deer population.)

News roundabout

Since 1909 the town of Queensbury has employed officers to patrol the Lake George Road to control fast driving by motorists. More than 50 percent of the drivers are exceeding the 20 miles per hour limit. Warnings are being issued and some arrests are being made.

Readers are welcome to contact Adirondack Journal correspondent Jean Hadden at jhadden1@nycap.rr.com or 623-2210.

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