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Turning Back the Pages

For 21 years around the turn of the 20th century, this building was the headquarters of the Glens Falls Insurance Co.  on the east side of Glen St. north of Bay St. The photograph shows it raised from its foundation in 1912, ready to be moved across Glen St. to become a Masonic temple. In subsequent years, it was incorporated into the Episcopal Church campus. The ‘new’ insurance building built on the east side of the road was demolished in the 1970, replaced by Glens Falls’ sole ‘skyscraper.’

For 21 years around the turn of the 20th century, this building was the headquarters of the Glens Falls Insurance Co. on the east side of Glen St. north of Bay St. The photograph shows it raised from its foundation in 1912, ready to be moved across Glen St. to become a Masonic temple. In subsequent years, it was incorporated into the Episcopal Church campus. The ‘new’ insurance building built on the east side of the road was demolished in the 1970, replaced by Glens Falls’ sole ‘skyscraper.’

Severe weather strikes area

We are having good winter weather with plenty of snow and cold. The mercury registered 32 degrees below zero Sunday morning, Feb. 11, 1912, coupled with fierce winds that cut like a knife.

The roads were drifted full and mountain high in places and the drifts were so hard horses could walk on them, only occasionally breaking through. It took foreman Douglas Morehouse of Edwards Hill and a force of men with shovels and a team nearly all day to get to the village of Bakers Mills, a distance of two and a half miles. Many of the crossroads are not yet opened leaving many people stranded.

A teamster in Graphite had his nose badly frozen. Some people have resorted to burning lanterns in their cellars to keep their vegetables from freezing. Water pipes are frozen up and cellars are freezing that have never been known to freeze before.

School chief takes a frigid hike

Professor Franklin F. Gunn of Glens Falls, Superintendent of Schools in the first district of Warren County, came to Warrensburgh Monday morning Feb. 12, 1912 on a professional trip.

Among the schools he desired to visit was the Tollgate School on the Chester Road, about three miles north of the village. Being unable to procure a conveyance of any kind, the livery rigs all being in use at the Masonic funeral in Thurman, he hiked northward at a good swinging gait and “got there” in good time, returning in the same way. A six-mile walk in sub-zero weather evidently has no terrors for Professor Gunn. (Note: The Tollgate building was on the south corner of the intersection of today’s Rte 9 and Rte. 28. My late friend, Ella Sutphin used to live in the old schoolhouse.)

Accident could prove fatal

Mrs. H. Truax of Bolton Landing is suffering from severe burns as the result of an accident which occurred at her home Saturday night, Feb. 10, 1912. A lighted lamp sitting on a table was overturned and falling to the floor spread kerosene oil about the carpet. The oil ignited and set fire to the woman’s clothes. She was quickly enveloped in flames and before her clothing could be removed or the fire extinguished she was seriously burned. She is in critical condition.

Readers are welcome to contact Adirondack Journal correspondent Jean Hadden at jhadden1@nycap.rr.com or 623-2210.

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