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King’s Garden receives International Paper grant

International Paper Foundation has awarded Fort Ticonderoga  a $1,000 grant to help underwrite its 2012 children’s garden programs.

International Paper Foundation has awarded Fort Ticonderoga a $1,000 grant to help underwrite its 2012 children’s garden programs.

— International Paper Foundation has awarded Fort Ticonderoga a $1,000 grant to help underwrite its 2012 children’s garden programs.

The grant will provide funds for materials and supplies needed for the new program series, “Growing up with Gardening: Sow, Grow & Know!,” which will take place this summer in the King’s Garden’s Discovery Garden area at Fort Ticonderoga for children ages 3 - 8.

“‘Growing up with Gardening: Sow, Grow and Know!’ program series will encourage young visitors to learn about different vegetables, flowers and insects,” said Beth Hill, Fort Ticonderoga executive director. “Four new themed areas within the Discovery Garden will be unveiled this year including Flying Friends, a garden bed devoted to attracting pollinators; Vegetable Maze, a non-traditional free-form vegetable area; Edible Petals Patch, a garden devoted to plants with edible flowers; and Onion Island, a garden bed devoted to the Allium or onion genus.”

The program will offer “Sensational Sunflowers!” on July 10, “Ladybug Investigators” on July 24, “Vegetables on My Plate: Roots, Shoots or Fruits?” on Aug. 7 and “Flowers on My Plate: Edible and Beautiful!” on Aug. 21.

“The Discovery Garden located in the stunning King’s Garden at Fort Ticonderoga offers a wonderful opportunity for families to explore beauty and nature at one of America’s oldest and most significant historic sites,” Hill said.

The King’s Garden is open June 1 through Oct. 8 and offers a wide variety of horticulture programs throughout the season.

Fort Ticonderoga’s gardening programs are part of “Let’s Move Museums & Gardens” organized by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Priorities of the program include getting children to eat healthy and get active in an effort to solve the problem of childhood obesity.

The walled King’s Garden was originally designed in 1921 by leading landscape architect Marian Coffin. The formal elements – a reflecting pool, manicured lawn and hedges, and brick walls and walkways – are softened by a profusion of annuals and perennials, carefully arranged by color and form. Heirloom flowers and modern cultivars are used to recreate the historic planting scheme. Visitor favorites include the lavender border, towering hollyhocks, bearded irises, dinner plate dahlias and many types of phlox.

Outside of the nine-foot brick walls of the colonial revival King’s Garden, the Discovery Gardens include a children’s garden, military vegetable garden, and Three Sisters Garden. The restored Lord and Burnham greenhouse, charming gazebo, sweeping lawns and shady picnic spots invite visitors to explore the landscape at one of America’s oldest gardens dating to the French occupation of the fort in the mid-18th century.

For more information go online at www.fortticonderoga.org/visit/gardens or call 585-2821.

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