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Lake Placid School super staying despite calls for resignation

Former principal: I’ll vote no on budget in protest

Former Lake Placid Middle/High School Principal Robert Schiller hands Lake Placid Central School Board President Phil Baumbach a petition of almost 600 names of people who are demanding that School Superintendent Randy Richards resign during the Feb. 21 meeting. Richards, seen at the far right, had admitted to and apologized for using inappropriate language when referring to female employees.

Former Lake Placid Middle/High School Principal Robert Schiller hands Lake Placid Central School Board President Phil Baumbach a petition of almost 600 names of people who are demanding that School Superintendent Randy Richards resign during the Feb. 21 meeting. Richards, seen at the far right, had admitted to and apologized for using inappropriate language when referring to female employees. Photo by Andy Flynn.

Upon advice of the district counsel, Richards said he will not be providing any additional comment.

Schiller and many others have been asking Richards to resign and putting pressure on the School Board since December, when it was revealed that the superintendent had used inappropriate language when referring to female employees. Richards apologized for his actions in a districtwide letter, but that hasn’t stopped members of the community from seeking to oust him from his job.

Baumbach has said that the School Board is standing behind Richards and that discussing personnel matters in public would be “inappropriate and non-productive.”

Baumbach told the Valley News that he anticipates Richards serving out his contract.

Home ec. teacher axed

After the April 17 meeting, Marsha Roy, the district’s longtime home economics teacher, told the Valley News that her position was eliminated and that her courses will be taught on a fill-in basis by teachers of other subjects when they are available.

Roy was disappointed that her job was not discussed publically by district leaders, who are set to trim spending on sports, summer school and transportation in addition to spending on instructors as they seek to abide by the state’s new tax levy increase cap.

Richards confirmed that Roy’s job will be cut.

“It’s not in the budget right now,” the superintendent said. “We’re going to deliver the instruction a different way. We’re required to teach home and careers at the middle school level and we’re going to split that duty up among some existing teachers right now. We’re going to map it out and see if we can do without it, because this year’s budget is so tight.”

Roy had formally retired at the end of last year, but agreed to teach a few classes a day this year. Richards said other home and careers courses are currently being taught by other teachers.

(Andy Flynn contributed to this article.)

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