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Labor Day punctuates summer season

Notes from the North Woods

Paddling the Boquet River, from New Russia to The Wadhams Road in E-town, this was just one of the new log dams created by Tropical Storm Irene.

Paddling the Boquet River, from New Russia to The Wadhams Road in E-town, this was just one of the new log dams created by Tropical Storm Irene. Photo by Joe Hackett.

Work hard

Throughout the region, Labor Day weekend has historically been considered a benchmark for the completion of the summer season. Just as the Fourth of July jump-starts the summer, Labor Day is a punctuation mark, to signal the conclusion of the summer season.

Seasonal camps will be shuttered. Boats will be pulled and canoes returned to their racks, as mothballs are scattered, and linens are safely tucked away in a mouse-proof trunk.

As kids return to school, and the summer folk go back to their homes, the pace of life in the park will begin to slow. It is a different time, and it can be evidenced on the highway, or on Main Street; the rushing about is finally over.

It may take a while, but eventually the locals revert back to a less hurried style, to a quieter, calmer and easier existence. It becomes a time to take care of your own, to fix that squeaky back door, restock the woodshed, or to take stock of the season.

On the day after Labor Day, there is usually a discernible, and collective sigh of relief that resonate from across the region. However, the traditional sigh of relief which usually resonates at this time of year, may be a bit late arriving.

Many locals will still be taking care of more pressing matters, especially in the small communities of Keene, Keene Valley, Wilmington, Jay, Ausable Forks and in other, flood ravaged towns.

As is the custom, neighbors will continue to help neighbors, and strangers alike.

I really like Governor Cuomo’s new "Labor for your Neighbor" campaign. It sure is a catchy gambit, but it’s really nothing new to the residents of the Adirondack region. We have always “labored with” our neighbors. Whatever the weather, we’ve stacked sandbags, shoveled snow from roofs, raised the barns, or put out the fire.

Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net

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