Quantcast

Native America event coming to Ti

Pow wow slated Oct. 22

Red Hawk, a local Abenaki in authentic attire, will take part as the Ticonderoga Historical Society hosts a Native American pow wow for children on Saturday, Oct. 22, 1 to 4 p.m. at the Hancock House, 6 Moses Circle.

Red Hawk, a local Abenaki in authentic attire, will take part as the Ticonderoga Historical Society hosts a Native American pow wow for children on Saturday, Oct. 22, 1 to 4 p.m. at the Hancock House, 6 Moses Circle.

— The Ticonderoga Historical Society will host a Native American pow wow for children on Saturday, Oct. 22, 1 to 4 p.m. at the Hancock House, 6 Moses Circle.

“This is the first in a planned series of arts and cultural seminars for children and their parents, showcasing the diverse heritage and deep traditions of Native American peoples,” said June Curtis of the historical society. “A pow wow is described as a gathering of Indian people to enjoy friendships, meet old friends and make new ones while preserving their rich heritage and reflecting on their old ways.”

Red Hawk, a local Abenaki in authentic attire, will present a children’s learning program outside on the lawn focusing on survival tools, demonstrating the crafting of the “tomhegan” and the making of fire using a bow drill.

“Through his storytelling, the kids will learn the legends of the origin of maple syrup and how those of us living in the Adirondacks were at one time known as ‘bark eaters’,” Curtis said.

The second segment of the program will be led by several artists from Ticonderoga Arts who have a number of creative projects planned utilizing hides, feathers and tattoos as well as corn, squash and beans. Each student will construct a medicine pouch from tanned animal hide while learning of the magical beliefs of carrying this bag. Face painting will take the form of Native American tattoos. Painted symbols like a feather, a snake, an arrow, each representing a unique cultural expression will be offered. Feathers are being gathered for decorative hair braiding, once communicating the message of tribe, clan or status.

“Since no pow wow would be complete without food, the Three Sisters, one of the treasures of traditional knowledge, will be prepared for the afternoon snack,” Curtis said.

Sharon Lonergan will continue the cultural journey with a presentation on the changes that occurred once the Indians met the White Man. She’ll discuss how the Europeans traded glass beads, guns and cloth for furs and how clothing made from cloth rather than skins became widespread at this time. The students will be able to dress up as Lonergan has stitched up a few of these garments.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment