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Looking back, into the future

Notes from the North Woods

A huge, lone pine, which has managed to maintain a presence atop a rocky outcrop, in the middle of Cranberry Lake, despite the rigors of waves, weather and winter, offers a suitable symbol of the hardiness and stubborn nature of Adirondackers.

A huge, lone pine, which has managed to maintain a presence atop a rocky outcrop, in the middle of Cranberry Lake, despite the rigors of waves, weather and winter, offers a suitable symbol of the hardiness and stubborn nature of Adirondackers. Photo by Joe Hackett.

It was determined the forests, lakes and mountains, raging rivers and howling wildlife of the region were of greater human weight, if they remained intact in a natural state, rather than being packed out as industrial freight.

This concept is still easy to grasp, especially when it is considered from atop a mountaintop lookout, or while paddling upon a stillwater pond. However, the focus becomes increasingly fuzzy when there’s a family to feed, a house to heat or land taxes due.

The region’s most contentious challenge will continue to be the ongoing effort to balance a perpetual protection of natural resources, with the preservation of a unique breed of people. Optimistically, I believe we’ll rebound, like the earth’s crust below!

Joe Hackett is a guide and sportsman residing in Ray Brook. Contact him at brookside18@adelphia.net

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