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Herrick’s store faces tax foreclosure auction

No minimum bid set

The historic building on the Schroon River in Warrensburg that once housed Herrick’s Variety Store is going up for bid oct. 15  in Warren County’s tax foreclosure auction. Assessed at $70,000, the parcel, along with 17 others, has no minimum bid.

The historic building on the Schroon River in Warrensburg that once housed Herrick’s Variety Store is going up for bid oct. 15 in Warren County’s tax foreclosure auction. Assessed at $70,000, the parcel, along with 17 others, has no minimum bid. Photo by Thom Randall.

— The historic former Herrick’s Variety Store, which is perched on the edge of the Schroon River, is set to be sold in Warren County’s tax foreclosure auction Saturday Oct. 15.

For decades, it was a busy hometown grocery store with a deli. In the 1980s, such goods were augmented by hunting and fishing supplies and equipment as well, when it was owned and operated by Dick Maxam, a son-in-law of the second generation of Herricks.

Dennis Brower, an Real Estate broker-associate with Caldwell Banker, has been recently marketing the property for $59,000.

Charles Vreugde of Queensbury, the owner, said Oct. 7 that he he bought the property in Sept. 2006 for $50,000 cash and had invested a lot of work into it.

Vreugde had shored up the building with a post-and-beam structure inside. He said he had plans of operating a second-hand store on the first floor, while restoring the two apartments on the second floor for rentals.

He said that the taxes owed on it were about $5,400, but that he was temporarily cash short.

“It’s the state of the economy,” Vreugde said.

There is no minimum bid on the building. Vreugde said that despite his investment, he’ll be happy if another bidder ends up with the property, even if the upset sale price is only $20.

But he added that he’ll only be happy about the sale if the new owner restores the structure to its former state.

“The building has a great potential,” he said, noting that when he was working on it in recent years, former tenants of the apartments and store customers often stopped in and shared stories and pictures of the building in its heydays.

“I love the building, the river in the rear, and the people in the area, but it’s time to step back,” he said.

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