Quantcast

County firefighters herald in National Fire Prevention Week

The National Fire Protection Association gives reminders on how to protect against fires during Fire Prevention Week every October.

The National Fire Protection Association gives reminders on how to protect against fires during Fire Prevention Week every October. Submitted photo

— Firefighters are getting the word out about fire safety and this is a time of year when there’s a particularly more intense focus on the subject.

Chuck Kostyk and Mark LaFountain with the Clinton County Firefighters Association addressed the media during a press conference Oct. 6, getting the word out about National Fire Prevention Week. This year’s designated week — sponsored by the National Fire Protection Association — will be Sunday, Oct. 9, through Saturday, Oct. 15, and will include visits to local schools by area firefighters teaching fire safety.

Though National Fire Prevention Week is promoted each year, LaFountain said it’s important to remind the public — especially children — of what to do in the event of a fire and how to prevent one in the first place.

“The best way to save lives is to prevent the fire from happening,” said LaFountain, a member of the Beekmantown Volunteer Fire Department. “And, the more we can get the message out, the safer everyone’s going to be.”

The topics firefighters will be discussing with students will include regularly changing batteries in their home smoke detectors, identifying potential fire hazards and developing an evacuation plan for use in the event of a fire.

“Over the course of the next week, almost every elementary school in the county is going to have some sort of contact from a fire department for fire prevention,” said Kostyk. “We really encourage the parents to talk to their kids about what they’ve learned and ask them questions.”

LaFountain’s hope is that by starting a dialogue about fire safety more families will be prepared in the event of a fire, especially knowing what steps they can take to detect a fire and a plan of action.

“The sooner it can be detected, the better the chance of someone getting out,” said LaFountain.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment