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New Lake George board members assess victory

At a recent press conference held recently beside Lake George, Marisa Muratori, Dennis Dickinson and Dan Hurley — who pulled a political coup in the November elections — talked about their surprise over their hefty vote margins, as well as their plans for the future.

At a recent press conference held recently beside Lake George, Marisa Muratori, Dennis Dickinson and Dan Hurley — who pulled a political coup in the November elections — talked about their surprise over their hefty vote margins, as well as their plans for the future. Photo by Thom Randall.

— Dan Hurley stood on the steel pier off beach road, with the blue waters as a backdrop for a television broadcast recounting election results in Lake George.

Days before, he and two other independent candidates had won seats on the Lake George Town Board, constituting a new majority that overthrew three incumbents with lengthy tenures.

He winced as a television news reporter clipped a microphone on his collar.

“I’m scared to death,” he commented, although he didn’t exhibit any fear in the interview that followed.

During the news conference, Hurley, as well as Supervisor-elect Dennis Dickinson and soon-to-be councilwoman Marisa Muratori, outlined their pending objectives and expressed surprise over the election results, which were unprecedented in the region.

The three ran together, supported by the lake George Citizen’s Group, which had for years questioned and challenged the practices and policies of incumbent town board.

It was the first time in recent history that an independent party had overthrown reigning Republicans. After the election, however, the candidates and party officials quelled their complaints, offering a measure of praise to those the newcomers are poised to replace.

“The present administration’s done a good job,” Hurley said, referring to the Exit 21 Corridor project, which he said is a project he looks forward to working on during the coming months. “The new sidewalks, landscaping and lighting are going to be beautiful.”

Although the citizens group had for months campaigned for fundamental changes, Hurley said he was going to move forward at a measured pace.

“I won’t be seeking any big changes,” he said, adding that he wouldn't’ be seeking to replace or lay off any town employees.

Muratori said she was seeking to build a new consensus among local citizens in working toward community betterment.

She echoed the oft-repeated contention of the citizens group’s members, that local government had to be more transparent and responsive.

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