Quantcast

Update on Addison Northeast Negotiations

The teachers of the Addison Northeast Supervisory Union are disappointed that they and the boards were unable to reach a settlement Dec. 16, and are concerned about the direction of negotiations. A tentative meeting is scheduled by the school boards Jan. 5 to take action on negotiations - possibly deciding to unilaterally impose working conditions for the school year instead of bargaining an agreement.

Walking away from the negotiations table and imposing working conditions will hurt the relationship between teachers and the school boards. It also hurts our schools, community and students because it represents a break down of a willingness to work together.

It is important to understand what is at stake, and what separates the members of the Addison Northeast Education Association from the supervisory union's boards.

The teachers have been working without a contract this year (over 6 months); they have remained in the classrooms, teaching the community's children; and they are committed to their schools, their students and their profession.

And while teachers acknowledge that the boards have begun to compromise - their initial proposals would have doubled the cost of health insurance, cut pay by thousands of dollars, increase the school day and remove important workplace protections - they are worried that the board's declaration of a "final offer" bodes poorly for a settlement.

The board's proposals would still cut teacher pay, given the average $600-a-year extra teachers are paying toward their retirement system.

The board's proposals would still boost the cost of health insurance by 50 percent, at a cost of hundreds of dollars a year for every teacher.

The boards are, at a time when teachers are working hard to ensure that our schools are providing an outstanding education to all students, seeking to force teachers to spend more times in meetings outside of their classrooms.

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment