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Here's to a better, brighter idea

Among the more absurd actions of the two-term Bush administration-and the Congress of the time-was the ban on the Edison light bulb in 2007.

This ill-advised ban takes affect next year. Environmentalists turned the good old-fashioned incandescent light bulb into a "green" boogie man. The anti-Edison bulb folks were thrilled to see the artificially supported rise of the odious and toxic compact fluorescent light (or CFL) and the Big Brother government-enforced fall of the Edison bulb.

As I see it, the ban on Edison incandescent bulbs was a small part of all the foolish anti-energy legislation passed by the Democratic-controlled Congress (and signed into law by Republican President George W. Bush) back in 2007.

The chief sponsors of the bulb ban were Rep. Jane Harman (D-Calif.) and Rep. Fred Upton (R-Mich.). The porcelain busts of both legislators deserve their special alcoves in our ever-expanding National Shrine of Dumb Ideas.

Since the day President Bush signed the Harmon-Upton ban into law, I became an Edison bulb hoarder. Yup, I make no apologies about this fact. I like incandescent light sources and will continue to use the devices. My eyesight is precious and I have no intention of ruining it under harsh fluorescent lighting.

My survival plan is to add to my growing stockpile of Edison bulbs that will see me through and light the way for years to come-long after the phased-in ban. It is my way to defy an arrogant, know-it-all federal government. And that's why I wholeheartedly support the efforts of Freedom Action.

My sister-in-law, a resident of California, reports that Edison bulbs are already banned in the formerly Golden State; residents are under penalty of law if they sneak bulbs across the stateline. Now that's creepy stuff!

Last month, the non-partisan Freedom Action citizens group launched a national grassroots campaign to repeal the ban on incandescent light bulbs scheduled to begin on Jan. 1, 2012.

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