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Officials seek return of water surveys

Information key to grant funding

Ticonderoga residents may soon hear a knock at their door, but it won’t be a holiday caroler. Town officials are beginning a door-to-door canvas of the community’s water districts seeking the return of income surveys that may hold the key to grant funding for a comprehensive drinking water project.

Ticonderoga residents may soon hear a knock at their door, but it won’t be a holiday caroler. Town officials are beginning a door-to-door canvas of the community’s water districts seeking the return of income surveys that may hold the key to grant funding for a comprehensive drinking water project.

— Ticonderoga residents may soon hear a knock at their door, but it won’t be a holiday caroler.

Town officials are beginning a door-to-door canvas of the community’s water districts seeking the return of income surveys that may hold the key to grant funding for a comprehensive drinking water project.

The confidential income surveys were sent to water customers in October. The information is needed to seek grant money for a $13.8 million water project.

To date about 50 percent of the surveys have been returned. To be eligible for the grant funding, 65 percent of the surveys must be completed.

“I know some people don’t like providing this information,” Supervisor Deb Malaney said, “but it’s entirely confidential. The surveys are numbered, there are no names, and they go directly to the IDA (Essex County Industrial Development Agency) in Elizabethtown. No one here will see them.”

The surveys are crucial if Ticonderoga is to qualify for grant funding, trustee Wayne Taylor said.

“We’re pleading with people to please participate,” Taylor said. “This is very important.”

Sue Huestis, Ti water and sewer clerk, said people can still return the survey. If they have misplaced the survey or if they have questions, people can call Huestis at 585-6265 ext. 10.

“We’ll be knocking on doors,” Malaney said of efforts to get survey responses. “It’s all about getting good, quality drinking water for the community. It makes a lot more sense to try and qualify for a grant than it does to add the cost to the taxpayers’ backs.”

Facing a state mandate, the town of Ticonderoga is about to begin a comprehensive water system upgrade.

Town officials hope to replace the existing water system, which draws water from Lake George and Gooseneck Pond, with a series of wells.

The proposed groundwater project is estimated to cost up to $13.8 million.

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