Quantcast

Ti man wants to attract breweries to region

Beer could become major contributor to local economy

The former Porter’s Mill store — the old Agway — in Crown Point has been identified as a possible location for brewery by Ken Tucker, a Ticonderoga resident with plans to attract small breweries throughout the region.

The former Porter’s Mill store — the old Agway — in Crown Point has been identified as a possible location for brewery by Ken Tucker, a Ticonderoga resident with plans to attract small breweries throughout the region. Photo by Nancy Frasier.

— “The Adirondack Park is about the size of Vermont; we have about the same population,” he said. “Why can’t the Adirondacks of New York have the same footprint? Vermont exports a lot of beer and imports a lot of money. We can do that, too.”

While he awaits federal approval of the “regional center,” Tucker is contacting potential investors and investigating possible locations for breweries. To date he has identified six spots he feels are ideal for the project — in Crown Point, Keeseville, Saranac Lake, Lake Placid and Plattsburgh.

The Crown Point location is the former Porter’s Mill store — the old Agway — on Route 9N.

“It sits right on Putts Creek with plenty of pure, clean water and has a wonderful view,” Tucker said of the Crown Point spot. “I think it’s a great lcoation.”

Bethany Kosmider, Crown Point supervisor, agrees.

“Ken Tucker met with me a few weeks ago and it is quite apparent there is an interested business, a micro-brewery,” said Kosmider, who is leaving office Dec. 31. “I’m sorry this didn’t happen while I was in office, but at least it’s gotten started.”

Once the breweries are up and running, Tucker hopes to create a distribution network through the Adirondack Brewers Coalition.

The project will impact the local economy in a number of ways, Tucker said. Historic buildings that now sit vacant will be renovated into breweries, pubs and restauarants. Plants will hire workers. Local farmers will be able to grow hops, a necessary ingredient in beer making.

“You’ve got to see the big picture,” he said. “We’ll start with small breweries and grow from there. Soon Adirondack brews will have a cachet and value equal to ‘made in Vermont.’ We’re close and I couldn’t be more excited.”

0
Vote on this Story by clicking on the Icon

Comments

Use the comment form below to begin a discussion about this content.

Sign in to comment