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Clinton County emergency officials list road closures

People urged to exercise caution near floodwaters

A fallen tree rests on power lines on Cornelia Street in the city of Plattsburgh Sunday evening. Department of public works crews and emergency officials were kept busy cleaning up after weather caused by Hurricane Irene.

A fallen tree rests on power lines on Cornelia Street in the city of Plattsburgh Sunday evening. Department of public works crews and emergency officials were kept busy cleaning up after weather caused by Hurricane Irene. Photo by Jeremiah S. Papineau.

Chazy: State Route from Miner Farm Road to Clarke Road, Slossen Road at Parker Road, and Fiske Road.

Dannemora: State Route 374 from Plank Road to Chazy Lake, State Route 374 east of Gen. Leroy Manor Road, and Wilford King Road.

Ellenburg: Bradley Pond Road, and Plank Road from State Route 190 to Smith Road.

Keeseville: Ausable Point Camp Grounds has been evacuated.

Mooers: Bush Road, Gero Road, Woods Falls Road, and Lavalley Road between U.S. Route 11 and Angelville Road

Peru: Peasleeville Road to Denton Road, and Felton Road between Clarke and Eccles Roads

Saranac: Kennedy Road to Dubray Road on State Route 374, and Bucks Corners Road.

Schuyler Falls: Austin Road off Turner Road off State Route 22B, State Route 22 at South Junction Road intersection.

Emergency officials stress that if you come upon a flowing stream where water is above your ankles, stop, turn around, and go another way. Never try to walk, swim, or drive through such swift water. Most flood fatalities are caused by people attempting to drive through water, or people playing in high water. If water is moving swiftly, even water six inches deep can sweep you off your feet.

Here are some tips from emergency officials about what to do if you are driving during a flood:

  • Avoid already flooded areas, and areas subject to sudden flooding. Do not attempt to cross flowing streams. Most flood fatalities are caused by people attempting to drive through water, or people playing in high water. The depth of water is not always obvious. The roadbed may be washed out under the water, and you could be stranded or trapped. Rapidly rising water may stall the engine, engulf the vehicle and its occupants, and sweep them away. Look out for flooding at highway dips, bridges, and low areas. Two feet of water will carry away most automobiles.
  • If you are driving and come upon rapidly rising waters, turn around and find another route. Move to higher ground away from rivers, streams, creeks, and storm drains. If your route is blocked by flood waters or barricades, find another route. Barricades are put up by local officials to protect people from unsafe roads. Driving around them can be a serious risk.
  • If your vehicle becomes surrounded by water or the engine stalls, and if you can safely get out, abandon your vehicle immediately and climb to higher ground. Many deaths have resulted from attempts to move stalled vehicles. When a vehicle stalls in the water, the water's momentum is transferred to the car. The lateral force of a foot of water moving at 10 miles per hour is about 500 pounds on the average automobile. The greatest effect is buoyancy - for every foot that water rises up the side of a car, it displaces 1,500 pounds of the car's weight. So, two feet of water moving at 10 miles per hour will float virtually any car. Many persons have been swept away by flood waters upon leaving their vehicles, which are later found without much damage. Use caution when abandoning your vehicle, and look for an opportunity to move away quickly and safely to higher ground.
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