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Horicon Day attracts crowd to town

HOME SWEET HORICON - In walking through a ‘Monkey Walk’ course during Horicon Day, 5-year-old Ruthie Brior from Brant Lake is assisted by local Boy Scouts Christiaan VanNispen, 16, (right) and Dylan Blake, 11, (left), both of Chestertown.

HOME SWEET HORICON - In walking through a ‘Monkey Walk’ course during Horicon Day, 5-year-old Ruthie Brior from Brant Lake is assisted by local Boy Scouts Christiaan VanNispen, 16, (right) and Dylan Blake, 11, (left), both of Chestertown. Photo by Thom Randall.

— For a day, the hamlet of Brant Lake was transformed into a scene from a bygone era.

Saturday, Aug. 6, the community was full of people sporting smiles, greeting neighbors they haven’t seen for a while, browsing among vendors, gawking at classic cars, and watching children play a variety of games.

Horicon Day, launched last year, was a success for 2011 despite questionable weather that may have reduced attendance.

“We had mobs of people despite a horrible forecast,” event organizer Maureen Wilson said. “At times, you couldn’t even get through the crowds.”

She said the event organizing committee onearly doubled the number of vendors, boosting the number of offerings to spark attendee’s varied interests.

“There was a tremendous amount of activities, and I saw an awful lot of new people at the event this year,” she said.

Wilson said vendors reported they experienced robust sales. Among those who attracted a lot of interest were the Tin Teepee with their fresh baked goods, Barbara Blum who offered her handcrafted packbaskets and doll clothes, Paul Frasco and his three-dimensional decoupage sculptures, Abe Gadjo with his Adirondack log furniture, and Matt Wood with his Rhino-Liners for pickups, she said. Matt, incidentally, was one of four generations in the Wood family participating in Horicon Days.

Also popular was East Shore Schroon Lake Association’s “moving river” display which not only offered an ecological exhibit, but children enjoyed playing in the sand, she said.

Real country roots music was provided by the incomparable Mike Leddick Band, based in Olmstedville.

Wilson said the Horicon Day committee is already starting to plan next year’s event.

“We’re hoping to add even greater variety with more new offerings,” she said, inviting area residents to call and offer their input.

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