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North Country SPCA 10-13-10

As Thanksgiving feast time quickly approaches, many of us are planning our ham or turkey dinner, coordinating the festivities with family and friends. During this time, it is easy to be tempted to include the family pets in the sharing of human food. However, even though your dog or cat may enjoy food prepared for people, it's best to provide them with their own treats, or a select few from the list of "safe" foods below. Be aware that many foods people eat can actually be toxic to animals - In 2007, the ASPCA's Animal Poison Control Center received more than 130,000 calls. Most cases of animal poisoning were caused by common human foods and household items.

Some of the more dangerous foods for your pet include: avocados, beer, nuts - especially walnuts and macadamia nuts, chocolate, candy, grapes and raisins, and onions. In contrast, lean meats, vegetables, baked potatoes, bread, rice, and pasta are generally good for your pet. Of course, it is always a good idea to consult with your family veterinarian prior to introducing any questionable human foods. If in doubt, there are plenty of healthy treats available designed specifically for your furry friend! For more information about safe human foods, see the article "People Foods that can Kill Your Pet" on msnbc.com.

Our featured pet today is Zeb, a handsome Shepherd-mix who is approximately six years old. This winsome fellow is full of exuberance, and loves to play, for for long car rides, take brisk walks with his human friends. Zeb is a gentle giant who was rescued by a caring member of the community; he arrived at the shelter emaciated and near death. Through the ministrations of the shelter staff, he has gained weight, recovered much of his vitality, and is beginning to show off his natural good looks. This charming canine is looking for someone who understands that he needs lots of exercise and affection. Perhaps that someone is you?

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