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Spring bursts onto the scene

The Adirondack Curriculum Project began in 1999 when a group of local educators decided to share lesson plans which were designed to incorporate elements of Adirondack history, culture, recreation and science lessons into the classroom.

It was evident to the initial group of educators that the region was rich in history, science and the arts, so they decided to share methods to incorporate these crucial elements of education into the curriculum through the development of a web-based resource pool. It is available at http://www.adkcurriculumproject.org/.

I was impressed with both the quality and content of the student's efforts. Mostly, I discovered that they could still teach an old dog new tricks.

Although I consider myself an educator, my two favorite classes in school were gym and recess. I actually excelled at recess, and often attempted to practice it at the most inappropriate of times by playing hooky. I couldn't have been too proficient at the guise, since my parents always seemed to know if I failed to arrive at school in a timely manner.

At the Adirondack Day event, the Newcomb students presented a project they had completed while studying the life and works of Jeanne Robert Foster.

I had probably heard about Foster in a high school English class back in the early 1970's, but at the time, there were surely more interesting topics to be learned by watching out the classroom window. If the Adirondack Curriculum Project had been in existence at the time, I certainly would have recognized Foster's name.

But, I know all about her now thanks to a handful of students from Newcomb Central School that provided me with a valuable lesson, and they did it in a most enjoyable manner.

Although Foster began life in the rugged Adirondack countryside, she traveled widely and mixed easily in a variety of social circles. She was an art collector, an author, editor and celebrity of worldwide acclaim, yet she never forgot her roots.

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